This ultra-precise drawing robot is the most mesmerizing thing you’ll see today

Ever wanted a robot that can draw pictures, forge signatures, and take care of all those handwritten wedding invitations you’ve been meaning to finish? Probably not — but even though you never asked for it, Evil Mad Scientist Labs went ahead and built a robot that can do all that stuff for you anyway.

Announced in late November, the AxiDraw V3 is a high performance consumer writing and drawing machine. Using fountain and ballpoint pens, markers, or even chalk, the AxiDraw V3 can do almost anything you could do with a handheld pen, according to the device’s creators.

The company designed the AxiDraw V3 from the ground up, prioritizing smooth, rolling wheels on aluminum extrusions “designed for high stiffness and light weight.” It’s quicker, with higher quality fine output than the previous version, which it’ll replace.

Evil Mad Scientist Labs wants the AxiDraw V3 to last a long time; “no parts on AxiDraw require regular replacement,” the company says on its website. Though if it is needed, users will be able to tinker with and adjust the device—the company takes a “screws not glue” approach to its design.

So what can you use it for? The AxiDraw V3 might not be ideal for the casual users—after all, it costs $475—it would come in especially handy for those who create lots of party invitations or sign tons of documents. Text is printed with a handmade look, something inkjet or laser printing simply can’t replicate. Evil Mad Scientist Labs suggests using the AxiDraw V3 for creating formal invitations, place cards, signing diplomas, addressing envelopes, computer generated artwork, thank you notes, and menus.

The printable area of the AxiDraw V3 is just about 8 1/2 x 11″, though the extendable drawing head allows the machine to draw on surfaces bigger than itself—that includes posters, chalkboards, or whiteboards.

Perfect handwriting is just $475 out of reach, unless you want to shell out the cash to save your arm some work.

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