This bleeding virtual leg may help train combat medics to perform better in the field

If the sight of blood makes you queasy, seeing virtual blood probably won’t be your cup of tea either. But in order to better prepare medics for emergency situations, these graphic simulations are being used to give combat medics a more realistic simulation of hairy situations. While nothing could fully prepare these individuals for the full horror of a war zone, the hope is that a fake, virtual leg gushing blood will provide a better sense of what to expect when they need to address the real thing.

“We’re genuinely hopeful that our simulations will enhance the educational experience for medical trainees,” Jeff Eldredge of the University of California, Los Angeles, told the New Scientist about his team’s work. “But I’m really pleased just to get visceral reactions from my kids. That probably makes me a horrible father.”

The new simulation is unique in its hyper-realistic representation of the injuries resulting from an explosion and the resulting shrapnel. Because the model uses the actual CT scan image of a real patient, the team was able to create a more precise representation of what blood vessels would be affected, how bleeding would occur, and how bone and skin particles would appear as well.

We are solving the governing equations of fluid dynamics and tissue mechanics, so these are truly physics-based simulations,” Eldredge noted, and the realism of this modeling may be integral in saving lives out in the field.

While the current manifestation of the simulation only allows medics in training to look at the wound, Eldredge and his team hope that moving forward, they’ll be able to allow participants to actually treat the virtual wound as well. This would enable trainees to see how their decisions affect the patient in real time, offering a truly novel hands-on experience as close to the real thing as is humanly, and humanely, possible.

“A visually faithful representation of the injury and bleeding is … important” in training exercises, says Eldredge. And now, we have a new resource to help us do just that.

Emerging Tech

Opportunity’s final image is a haunting panorama of the Martian surface

The Opportunity mission to Mars may be no more, but the rover's legacy lives on. Now NASA has released the final image captured by Opportunity, and it's a stunning panorama of the Martian surface.
Movies & TV

The best movies on Amazon Prime right now (March 2019)

Prime Video provides subscribers with access to a host of fantastic films, but sorting through the catalog can be an undertaking. Luckily, we've done the work for you. Here are the best movies on Amazon Prime Video right now.
Gaming

These are the must-have games that every Xbox One owner needs

More than four years into its life span, Microsoft's latest console is finally coming into its own. From Cuphead to Halo 5, the best Xbox One games offer something for players of every type.
Gaming

Your PlayStation 4 game library isn't complete without these games

Looking for the best PS4 games out there? Out of the massive crop of titles available, we selected the best you should buy. No matter what your genre of choice may be, there's something here for you.
Gaming

These are the classic NES games that helped redefine gaming

The NES left an indelible mark on pop culture and revolutionized the gaming industry. Check out our picks for the best NES games, whether you prefer an immersive RPG, side-scrolling brawler, or something else entirely.
Emerging Tech

A lunar time capsule: 50-year-old moon rock samples to be opened for study

Nearly 50 years after the Apollo missions to the Moon, NASA is breaking open samples of Moon rock for the first time. Samples collected from Apollo missions 15, 16, and 17 have been preserved and never before exposed to Earth's atmosphere.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Write music with your voice, make homemade cheese

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Emerging Tech

Gorgeous image of the Cosmic Bat nebula leaves us starry-eyed

The "Cosmic Bat" nebula has been captured in beautiful detail by the European Southern Observatory. Formally known as NGC 1788, the nebula is two thousand light-years away in a dark corner of the Orion constellation.
Emerging Tech

Super telescope captures supermassive black holes forming billions of years ago

The Subaru Telescope in Hawaii has captured evidence of supermassive black holes forming in the ancient universe. Astronomers discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes from billions of years ago.
Emerging Tech

Mind-bending model shows Venus isn’t our nearest neighbor — it’s Mercury

Every textbook and table on the internet agrees -- the closest planet to Earth is Venus. But a new mathematical model shows that this is wrong. In fact, the planet closest to us on average is Mercury.
Emerging Tech

Desk lamps take on a new task by converting their light to power

What if we could charge devices using light from indoor sources like desk lamps? A group of scientists working on a technology called organic photovoltaics (OPVs) aim to do just that.
Emerging Tech

Body surrogate robot helps people with motor impairments care for themselves

A team from Georgia Tech has come up with an assistant robot to help people who have severe motor impairments to perform tasks like shaving, brushing their hair, or drinking water.
Emerging Tech

New Hubble image displays dazzling Messier 28 globular cluster

Messier 28 is a group of stars in the constellation of Sagittarius, located 18,000 light-years from our planet. Thousands of stars are packed tightly together in this sparkling image.
Emerging Tech

Cosmic dust bunnies: Scientists find unexpected ring around Mercury

A pair of scientists searching for a dust-free region near the Sun have made an unexpected discovery: a vast cosmic dust ring millions of miles wide around the tiny planet Mercury.