Boeing patent promises a comfortable sleep at 30,000 feet

boeings latest idea to help you sleep better on planes sleeping
Unless you’ve splashed out on a first-class cabin, chances are you don’t particularly enjoy the experience of trying to sleep while flying. Boeing wants to make your snoozes a little bit more comfortable with a newly patented idea that allows you to lean forward in your seat while you doze off.

Boeing patent

Here’s how it works: You take out a backpack from under your seat, attach the harness it contains to the back of the seat, and then drift off while leaning forward with your head and arms supported by the contraption. Both your head and chest are cushioned for added comfort.

Sound like something you’d want to set up for yourself at 30,000 feet? Of course this is just a patent so the usual rules apply — it might never see the light of day and it might change significantly along the way. Even so, it’s an interesting idea to help try and solve one of the biggest problems with flying.

Boeing’s documentation goes into great detail about the issues of trying to fall asleep while cooped up in a airplane cabin, including various contortions people try to get comfortable. Using neck pillows or leaning forward onto the food tray are both discussed and dismissed as flawed solutions.

“It is therefore desirable to provide an integrated system attachable to vehicle transport seats for upright support of a seated passenger in a comfortable position for sleep,” explains the patent.

You might look a little bit daft while using it, but most people would probably take that chance if it meant getting some quality shut-eye between airports. Boeing says the harness will be designed to counter the effects of turbulence too, so even bumpy flights won’t interrupt your dreams.

Via The Verge

[Image courtesy of Surkov Vladimir/Shutterstock.com]

Photography

Peak Design’s Travel Tripod is must-have gear for photographers on the go

Peak Design has returned to Kickstarter to launch its latest product, the Travel Tripod. The company's first tripod, it uses a unique design with a triangular center column to minimize the volume it takes up in your bag.
Product Review

Hyundai’s luxurious Tucson suffocates you with more – in a good way

The refreshed 2019 Hyundai Tucson may be one of the more affordable compact SUVs on the market, but there are more safety features than before as standard, as well as a hint of luxury.
Product Review

The segment-bending 2020 Porsche Cayenne Coupe is an SUV in a track suit

For the 2020 model year, Porsche is expanding the third-generation Cayenne lineup with a more stylish Coupe-badged model. It's lower than a regular Cayenne, a little bit wider, and it wears a more muscular design.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Insect drones and kinetic sculpture robots

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it's fun to gawk!
Emerging Tech

This guy managed to squeeze an entire game console into a Game Boy cartridge

Popular YouTuber 3DSage has managed to compress an entire mobile games console inside a single original Game Boy cartridge. Check it out in all in its impressively miniaturized glory.
Emerging Tech

Ford’s bipedal delivery robot can walk straight up to your doorstep

Autonomous wheeled delivery robots are seemingly everywhere in 2019. Agility Robotics' Digit robot takes a different approach: It promises to carry out its deliveries while walking on two legs.
Emerging Tech

I mainlined a bag of liquid vitamins — for science

Healthy people are signing up for treatments that are typically saved for patients stuck in hospital beds. Known as nutrient IV therapy, the treatment entails pumping vitamins, minerals, and fluids directly into the bloodstream, bypassing…
Emerging Tech

Scientists use an X-ray laser to create the loudest possible underwater sound

Researchers from Stanford University and the Department of Energy have produced the loudest sound possible to make under water. Here's how they managed to create it — and why they did it.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Huawei updates, Starlink launch, and Pac-Man’s birthday

On this episode of DT Live, we discuss the ongoing Huawei saga, Amazon’s social games for workers, Ford's partnership with a robotics company, the Starlink satellite launch, Pac-Man’s birthday, and more.
Emerging Tech

Las Vegas officials bet big on Elon Musk’s Boring Company

Elon Musk’s Boring Company has just been awarded a $48.6 million contract by Las Vegas to build a high-speed transportation system beneath the city’s enormous convention center, and it could be ready by early 2020.
Emerging Tech

Airbus shows off the futuristic interior of its autonomous flying taxi

Airbus has given us the first look inside its single-seat flying taxi. The absence of controls in the Vahana electric aircraft is a reflection of its autonomous capabilities, so you can just sit back and enjoy the ride.
Emerging Tech

Future smart clothes promise to keep you the perfect temperature at all times

Regulating your body temperature can sometimes be tough. Engineers from UC San Diego have developed heating and cooling wearable tech which could be embedded into future smart clothing.
Emerging Tech

Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa 2 aborts marker drop mission

The Hayabusa 2 spacecraft's mission to drop a reflective marker on the surface of asteroid Ryugu has been aborted. The Japanese team was considering a second touchdown on the asteroid to collect more materials, but this now seems unlikely.
Emerging Tech

Whose name should we etch on the Mars 2020 rover? NASA wants a vote

Dream of making it to Mars? NASA has opened up a new public outreach program to let people send their names to the Red Planet, as an engraving on a silicon chip launched with the Mars 2020 rover.