Candle Charger is a tiny thermoelectric generator that powers your gadgets with fire

The revolution will be televised, because even if the power goes out we’ll be able to keep our phones and cameras charged. Generators aren’t always deafening anymore, and solar panels are a common affair these days; they build them into phone cases and fold them into handy little carrying cases. Biomass stoves that turn heat into electricity are a little newer and perfect for camping, but a terrible idea to use in a cramped apartment.  The FlameStower Company filled the niche for urban survivalists with the Candle Charger, and the name pretty much says it all.

It works like this: A long-burning candle heats the bottom of a water receptacle filled with 5oz of water, and the difference in temperature produces an electric charge. The Candle Charger puts out 2.5W for anything that takes a USB charge, and each candle lasts six hours.

Candle charger, USB chargerThe FlameStower team came up with the Candle Charger in response to suggestions from backers of the campaign for the little open-flame charger that is also the company name. While the FlameStower is small and light, and uses the same basic tech (water and heat) as the Candle Charger, it’s designed to sit over a larger open flame like a campfire, stove, or barbeque.

Since the Candle Charger works with just a candle, it’s safe for indoor use. All you need is a little water to get a USB charge. It was conceived as an addition to a survival kit, so the creators opted to keep the size small. It comes with a Stower six-hour candle, but they are pretty commonly available and a smart addition to any “go bag”.

It has nearly doubled its $30,000 Kickstarter goal, but there’s still a few days left where you can grab a Candle Charger for $65 instead of the $100 retail price. The other interesting perk is the P.O.P (Power Outage Prepared) kit for $125 that includes the Candle Charger, two candles, USB flashlights, and more, like possibly a multi-tool, long-burning matches, ReadyBath disposable washcloths and Aqua Blox 5-year shelf-life water. The campaign ends Friday morning, August 28.

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