Digital Dudz Halloween app is a small investment for an amazing costume

Digital Dudz Halloween app shirt

We’ve got just a couple of weeks to go before Halloween rolls around, so it’s only natural to start thinking about what costumes you’ll want to be donning this year. Do you want to go the comedic route, or the gory and scary? Should you dress up as something timely and relevant such as a 2012 political candidate or a character from this year’s big movies, such as The Hunger Games, Ted, Looper, or Prometheus? If you’re on a limited budget, look no further than Digital Dudz’s creepily awesome app. Wear it with one of the shirts Digital Dudz offer and you can have a special effects tee that looks like your heart is animating out of your chest, or you’ve got eyeballs darting around to those that have just walked by.

The Digital Dudz shirt are all designed with special cut-outs so you can tape your smartphone on the inside and display your phone’s screen from the cut-out. Then, all you have to do is launch the app and select the animation you want. Some of the animations include a spinning disco ball, a pounding wound, and a beating heart. Even if you had planned to dress as a zombie, adding the beating heart effect on your shirt will definitely take it to the next level.

We’ve seen similar ideas from last year’s Halloween, but dumbing it down to just an app and a shirt at less than $40 of total investment is foolproof marketing at the right time and place. It’s a simple, ingenious, and crazily freaky concept that’s inexpensive, cool, and makes a resourceful use of technology. We just wished Digital Dudz actually made a special pocket on the inside of the shirt instead of making customers duct tape their phones, as to prevent getting glue on the outside of their devices. Of course, if you don’t want to buy one of the shirts from the site, you can always cut up one of your own shirts, spill fake blood all over it, and animate a bleeding wound underneath.

Digital Dudz’s current offerings include shirts that range from downright gory to silly cartoons to even Romney and Obama, so you’ve got some pretty good options this Halloween. Each shirt range from $25 to $35 a pop, and the app is free, so unless you were planning on recycling clothes you already own as a costume, this will be one of the cheapest costumes compared to those pre-packaged cookie cutters from Halloween superstores. Let’s hope you’re ready to scare and blow the the masses’ minds this season.

Watch the videos below to see the Digital Dudz animations in their full effects.

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