Hoverboard with built-in cereal bowl is as absurd as it sounds

It came up with the bizarre Selfie Spoon last year so you kind of knew any follow-up contraption would be equally absurd. And we were right.

Part hoverboard, part cereal bowl, and part bonkers, the Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cruiser from food maker General Mills is a hoverboard with a built-in cereal bowl. That’s right, if you’re too busy to knock together a bowl of cereal before leaving the house for work, you can ride to work and eat at the same time. No, you won’t look silly at all.cinnamon toast crunch hoverboard

Pitched as the “ultimate solution for multi-tasking millennials,” the machine incorporates an ingenious “self-leveling bowl” for ease of use, and vital “spill-shield technology” to prevent a mess while riding. It even has a slot for your spoon.

Now, in case you’ve taken leave of your senses and are at this very moment shouting, “So tell me where I can buy this darn thing,” we’re sorry to inform you that, although the Cruiser does actually exist, it’s not for sale. Yes, it’s merely a marketing exercise focused on boosting sales of Cinnamon Toast Crunch and, more broadly, at getting cereal back on the breakfast table (or on a hoverboard?) following years of declining sales.

But the industry clearly has its work cut out. A Mintel survey last year showed that almost 40 percent of millennials found cereal to be an inconvenient breakfast choice “because they had to clean up after eating it.”

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