HydroView makes underwater photography an ease

HydroView underwater camera system on dock

Photography is cool, but you know what’s even cooler? Underwater photography. Not even trying too hard to make The Social Network reference here, but when underwater photography is done right, the results are often quite magnificent to see how the human body can move in a completely different natural state. However, unless you have scuba diving skills and can maneuver a camera at the same time, underwater photography can prove to be difficult without having your model swim in a glass tank. Let HydroView do the legwork without getting you wet.

HydroView is an waterproof video camera that can shoot full high-definition, 1080p videos and is steered with your laptop or tablet. The HD camera also has a built-in LED light for deeper, darker expeditions and has a self-generating Wi-Fi system to help live stream what you’re recording right to your iPad on dry land. You can record these HD scenes then look for the shot afterward without having to get in the water if you don’t want to. The videos can also be sent straight to your mobile device, be it iOS or Android.

“See the underwater world in an innovative way — whether it’s searching for lost valuables, studying marine life, checking water depths or inspecting under your boat,” says the HydroView product page. With summer on the way, you might even be able to play shark with the HydroView at your local community pool or beach.

The HydroView can swim at a forward speed of five knots and reverse speed of one knot, and its battery life will last you for up to two hours of recording. Weighing less than 10 pounds, the HydroView is a relatively portable machine to take with your on your next swimming trip. Unfortunately, the device isn’t wireless. A 75-foot cord is attached to the camera so you will have to be careful to not tangle the device as it maneuvers underwater. On the plus side, at least you won’t lose it if it swam too far out in the sea.

The HydroView set comes with an external battery pack and carrying case to put them all in. You can purchase the system at $4,000 through Aquabotix. Pretty expensive for the quirk, but could make for a fun big boy’s toy. Just try not to run into a shark before your camera becomes dinner.

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