New boxing-focused wearable tracks the type, speed, and power of your punches in real time

As boxing, mixed martial arts, and other combat sports become more and more popular, a company called Hykso is betting that real-time, accurate sensor data will empower fighters to get to the top of their game. Hykso’s wearable wrist sensor measures all kinds of punching and striking data to feed real-time feedback and results to athletes, trainers, and even fans watching fights live. Hopefully, combining the art of fighting with the data and science of accuracy will help Hykso fighters win, and win better.

Hykso’s wearable sensors include two 3-axis accelerometers (one F1 grade and one low-g) and a 3-axis gyroscope so that the system can measure punch speed, punch count, and striking intensity. It also recognizes exact punch timing and the type of punch the fighter has thrown in order to identify combination punches and attacks. The wearable lasts for about four hours on a full charge, and transmits data using Bluetooth Low Energy technology. That data shows up in the Hykso mobile app, allowing fighters and their teams to monitor and analyze specific punch data –including strengths and weaknesses– in real time.

Hykso punch tracking fitness fight wearable sensors
Hykso
Hykso

“We’ve found that watching in real time is a huge motivator for people. Even our top professional athletes tend to work a lot harder when they can see their punch volume and speed change based on their output,” said Tommy Duquette, one of Hykso’s co-founders. A private beta testing phase invited 35 gyms to work with Hykso while training their top athletes and clients. World-famous fighters like WBA world champion Javier Fortuna and undefeated pro Omar Figueroa were also involved in the beta testing phase.

Although Hykso intends its wearable for use during training sessions, it has already been used in live fight events and could become a big crowd-pleaser. With the right setup, the system lets fans see real-time punch totals, averages, and speeds on a screen. As part of a pre-order campaign, any athlete can get their hands on Hykso’s wearable wrist sensor for $153 for a limited time. Next week, the price will go back up to $220. The pre-order package includes two sensors, a charging station, and a download of the Hykso mobile app. Pre-orders come with a 30-day money back guarantee and a 1-year manufactuerer’s warranty, but Hykso’s website also states that “should you be especially disappointed by your order, it is also possible to settle things in the ring with Hykso’s CEO.” Gauntlet thrown.

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