Killer Whale Submarine is your ticket to awesome

Killer-Whale-Submarine-is-your-ticket-to-awesome

We have come to the conclusion that, quite frankly, there aren’t nearly enough drivable vehicles designed — or built to act — like animals. Sure, we’ve seen crab-inspired concept cars before, but nothing like this: The Seabreacher Y, also known as the Killer Whale Submarine.

The Killer Whale Submarine is actually the third submarine in a family of three submersibles built to look and perform like an animal. On top of the Ornicus Orca, which is geek-speak for Killer Whale, the Seabreacher Y is preceded by both the original Seabreacher (shaped like a dolphin) and the menacing Seabreacher X (shaped like a shark).

Killer-Whale-Submarine-cockpitBuilding on those previous platforms, the Killer Whale Submarine is a fully functional two-person watercraft designed to mimic its namesake. The sub can breach and submerge just like a real Killer Whale . It features a watertight ½-inch-thick acrylic canopy that protects the sub’s pilots. Housed underneath are two control levels that allow for control and steering over the whale’s (vessel’s) pectoral fins, enabling the sub to roll and dive with ease.

With a 225-horsepower Rotax supercharged engine, the Killer Whale Submarine is able to hit speeds of 25 mph underwater and, when hydroplaning over the surface, can increase that speed to a respectable 50 mph. But that’s not all; because of its abundance of power, the sub is able to “porpoise,” meaning it can jump out of the water and dive back down again just like a real killer whale. Unfortunately — unlike a true killer whale — the Seabreacher Y’s dorsal fin’s integrated snorkel can only ensure air supply to the engine up to a depth of 5 feet.

Inside the belly of the Seabreacher Y features all the bells and whistle one might expect to find in an underwater sub. The cockpit’s dashboard includes a speedometer, tachometer, engine, and air pressure gauges. There is even an LCD display that captures live video from the crafts dorsal fin camera. And to ensure safety, both pilot and passenger seats are equipped with four-point racing harnesses.

The Killer Whale Sub weighs 1,450 pound, packs a 14-gallon fuel tank, and measures 17-feet long. And if you are dead-set on purchasing one, be prepared to pay a whale of a price — $100,000, to be precise. We only ask that you play out childhood favorite: Michael Jackson’s “Will You Be There“(The theme song from Free Willy) when you’re making your majestic leaps out of the water. 

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