The unbelievable LIX 3D-printing pen lets you literally draw in the air

Remember 3Doodler — the world’s first 3D-printing pen that took Kickstarter by storm a little over a year ago? By using a special, quick-hardening filament, it allowed users to draw free-form three-dimensional objects by hand, instead of drawing out designs on a computer and using a printer to bring them to life. It was a groundbreaking idea, and gave people a new way to create things, but it was also somewhat squirrely and imprecise. For all of it’s creative potential, it was more of a fun toy than a serious design tool.

Now, a U.K. startup by the name of Lix is building a more precise version of this concept with professional users (designers, artists, architects, and the like) in mind, and just like 3Doodler before it, the device is blowing up on Kickstarter. Within its first two hours of launching yesterday, the Lix Pen crushed its £30K funding goal. As of this writing (roughly 24 hours after launch), it’s sitting pretty at £170K.

LIX 3D-printing pen

Technically speaking, the Lix Pen works almost exactly the way 3Doodler does. It’s essentially a handheld extruder that you load with a special ABS or PLA filament, and has two buttons that allow you to control the rate at which the material comes out. This gives users the ability to draw at different speeds, and create lines of varying thickness.

The difference between the two, however, is that the Lix Pen is considerably slimmer. Instead of looking like an oversized belicoso cigar, Lix Pen is sleek, slender, and constructed from lightweight aluminum rather than plastic. Additionally, it’s designed to work with a USB power cord, so even if you’re not near an outlet, you can plug the device into a laptop or other portable power source.

At this point the pen is just a prototype, but the Lix team is on the verge of finalizing the design, and plans to have it ready for mass production within the next couple months. If everything goes smoothly, they’re hoping to ship the first production models to backers as early as September of this year. All the “early bird” slots have already been snagged up, but you can still lock down a Lix Pen for $135 if you back the project now.

Head over to Kickstarter for more info.

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Self-balancing skates, tiny tripods, and more

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the Web this week. You can't buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Gaming

Your PlayStation 4 game library isn't complete without these games

Looking for the best PS4 games out there? Out of the massive crop of titles available, we selected the best you should buy. No matter what your genre of choice may be, there's something here for you.
Emerging Tech

How do 3D printers work? Here’s a super-simple breakdown

How do 3D printers work, exactly? If you ever wondered how these magical machines create 3D objects in a matter of hours, then look no further than this dead-simple breakdown of the four most common printing technologies.
Smart Home

OK, Google, what can you do? Tips and tricks for the Google Home

The Home functions in a similar fashion to its main competitor, the Amazon Echo, but has the added benefit of select Google services. Here are few tips to help you make the most of the newfangled device.
Emerging Tech

Giant wind farm in Morocco will help mine cryptocurrency, conserve energy

One of the windiest parts of Morocco is set to get a $2 billion wind farm power plant, which could help power eco-friendly cryptocurrency mining in a more environmentally friendly way.
Emerging Tech

Robots are going to steal 75 million jobs by 2025 — but there’s no need to panic

According to the World Economic Forum, robots and A.I. will take 75 million jobs from hardworking humans by 2025. That's the bad news. The good news is that they will create far more jobs than that.
Emerging Tech

An A.I. is designing retro video games — and they’re surprisingly good

Researchers from Georgia Tech have demonstrated how artificial intelligence can be used to create brand-new video games after being shown hours of classic 8-bit gaming action for inspiration.
Deals

Cyber Monday 2018: When it takes place and where to find the best deals

Cyber Monday is still a ways off, but it's never too early to start planning ahead. With so many different deals to choose from during one of the biggest shopping holidays of the year, going in with a little know-how makes all the…
Smart Home

Amazon might open 3,000 cashier-free Amazon Go stores by 2021

According to new reporting by Bloomburg, anonymous sources within Amazon say that CEO Jeff Bezos is considering opening up to 3,000 of the company's cashier-less, experimental Amazon Go stores by 2021.
Emerging Tech

Wormlike motion sculptures show how athletes move in 3D

Researchers at MIT have developed a system that offers athletes a unique way to visualize their bodies in motion. An algorithm scans 2D videos of a person in motion, and generates data points that can be 3D-printed into "motion sculptures."
Emerging Tech

Harvard’s soft robotic exosuit adapts itself to the needs of every wearer

Harvard engineers have developed a new multi-joint, textile-based soft robotic exosuit, designed to help soldiers, firefighters, and other rescue workers. Here's what makes it so exciting.
Emerging Tech

These flying cars want to take your commute to new heights

The future is closer than you'd think: Companies around the world are working on flying car models, with many successful tests! Here are all the flying cars and taxis currently in development, and how they work!
Computing

Tap Strap wearable keyboard gains support for VR applications

TAP System's wearable keyboard gains support for virtual reality, now compatible with Windows Mixed Reality, Oculus Rift, and HTV headsets. Type and tap for up to eight hours in VR without needing to look at a physical keyboard.
Emerging Tech

Robot jellyfish could be used to patrol fragile coral reefs

Could schools of robotic jellyfish soon be patrolling the world’s oceans, monitoring fragile environments such as coral reefs? A team of United States researchers certainly thinks so.