Madcap inventor creates red-hot knife that toasts bread as it cuts

Colin Furze is not your usual inventor. You only have to take a quick look at his YouTube videos to see that. His somewhat off-the-wall work, which has a long and proud tradition of ignoring health and safety concerns, has won him a substantial and loyal online following over the years.

Having already created a homemade “wall of death” for motorcycles, shoes that double as a vacuum cleaner, and a “jet bicycle” described by Furze as “the most dangerous, unsafe bike ever,” the inventor’s latest creation – a knife so hot that it toasts bread as it cuts it – is surely final confirmation that Furze is several slices short of a full loaf.

The bulky kit, which is most certainly not part of any Kickstarter campaign (yet), comprises a modified microwave transformer, “some big fat cables,” and “a kind of knife thing.” Switching the contraption on at the mains, Furze demonstrates how the blade quickly begins to glow red hot, perfect for a spot of bread slicing. Grabbing a loaf of bread, we see the eccentric inventor start cutting away, smoke billowing off the crust as he goes.

The result, it has to be said, looks (almost) edible.

If you happen to only have a sliced loaf at hand, you can still make toast in super-quick time by simply dragging the blade over each side of the bread. Brilliant. If you’re a toast addict who feels this is just the kind of awesome time-saving device you’ve been waiting for, Furze explains how to knock together the very same rig in a helpful video guide here.

Hit Furze’s wacky YouTube channel and you can see him walking across a ceiling wearing magnetic boots, standing inside a fireworks display wearing a metal suit, and filming up in the stratosphere with an HTC smartphone. He’s even picked up a bunch of Guinness World Records along the way, including ones for fastest baby stroller, longest motorcycle, and fastest toilet (well, we said he’s not your usual inventor).

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