Orvillecopter: Dead cat turned into flying machine after artist attaches propellers

orvillecopter dead cat turned into flying machine after artist attaches propellersWhen your beloved feline friend sounds its last purr before disappearing off to the great cattery in the sky, its owner could reasonably be expected to bury it in the yard or take it to a pet cemetery before bidding it a tearful farewell. Not so artist Bart Jansen.

When his cat, Orville, was killed after being hit by a car, he had a rather different idea — to turn his deceased pet into a helicopter. What Orville would’ve thought about being turned into a furry flying machine we’ll sadly never know, but hopefully he would’ve agreed with his owner’s unique idea.

The Dutch artist took his remote-controlled cat copter to the KunstRAI Art Fair in Amsterdam over the weekend, where he powered it up and got Orville airborne.

Describing his creation as “half-cat, half-machine,” the Orvillecopter comprises a dead cat, a Lotus T580 quadcopter and four plastic propellers attached to each of Orville’s paws.

orvillecopter dead cat turned into flying machine after artist attaches propellersIn a description accompanying a YouTube video showing one of the Orvillecopter’s test flights, Jansen explains that his cat was named after the famous aviator Orville Wright — which appears to suggest he always had plans to get Orville off the ground once he left the physical world.

“Now he is finally flying with the birds. The greatest goal a cat could ever reach!” Jansen wrote.

An online profile of the artist says Jansen’s work is “mostly about the race for technological progress in combination with the human error that surrounds this progress” and comprises “mostly inventions, new machines [and] devices that fulfill meaningless functions.” Ah, that’ll be the Orvillecopter then.

The video below shows a spread-eagled Orville flying majestically high above a field, though when he comes close to the ground he scares the living daylights out of some cows who up until then appeared to have been enjoying a quiet afternoon in the country; totally understandable of course as the last thing they expected to see was a cat strapped to a quadcopter coming their way.

[via LA Times] [Top image: Ardinges2]

Emerging Tech

This intelligent parachute system can bail out clumsy drone pilots

Parachutes can save drones when they unexpectedly fall from the sky. Among a number of such systems, Austrian firm Drone Rescue is this week showing off its latest design that automatically deploys when it senses trouble.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

There's more to Amazon Prime than free two-day shipping, including access to a number of phenomenal shows at no extra cost. To make the sifting easier, here are our favorite shows currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Movies & TV

The best new movie trailers: ‘Glass,’ ‘Mortal Engines,’ ‘Pet Sematary’ and more

Everyone loves a good trailer, but keeping up with what's new isn't easy. To simplify things, we round up the best ones each week. On tap this week: New trailers for Pet Sematary, Glass, Mortal Engines, and other upcoming films.
Computing

Was your Facebook account hacked in the latest breach? Here’s how to find out

Facebook now reports that its latest data breach affected only 30 million users, down from an initial estimate of 50 million accounts. You can also find out if hackers had accessed your account by visiting a dedicated portal.
Emerging Tech

From flying for fun to pro filmmaking, these are the best drones you can buy

In just the past few years, drones have transformed from a geeky hobbyist affair to a full-on cultural phenomenon. Here's a no-nonsense rundown of the best drones you can buy right now, no matter what kind of flying you plan to do.
Emerging Tech

Healthy mice born from two genetic mothers using stem cells, gene editing

Healthy mice have been born from two genetics mothers and later went on to bear healthy offspring of their own, according to a recent paper published by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
Emerging Tech

Light-swallowing room promises Call of Duty fans the blackest of ops

What's it like to be in a room fully painted with the world's darkest material, Vantablack? The makers of one of the year's top video games teamed up with Vantablack scientists to find out.
Emerging Tech

Japanese scientists are chewing over an ‘electric gum’ that never loses flavor

Researchers at Japan's Meiji University may have found the secret to unlimited chewing gum -- and it just involves zapping your tongue with electricity. Here's what makes it all work.
Smart Home

Vector, the engaging Alexa-like robot, is ready to roam around your home

Anyone who has ever watched Short Circuit or WALL-E has surely dreamed about having a robot buddy come live with them. Finally, that dream is now a reality. It's name is Vector, and it's available now.
Emerging Tech

Ekster 3.0 lets you ask, ‘Alexa, where did I leave my wallet?’

Ekster's newest smart wallet is its best yet. It's slimmer than ever, boasts a neat card-dispensing mechanism, and will even let you know where it is, thanks to smart speaker integration.
Emerging Tech

Johns Hopkins’ lab-grown human retina could lead to big insights

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University have successfully grown human retina tissue from scratch in a lab. The work could help with the development of new therapeutics related to eye diseases.
Wearables

Skydio’s self-flying drone now has an Apple Watch app for flight prep

Skydio's clever R1 autonomous drone now has its own Apple Watch app, making flight preparations simpler than ever. The $2,000 flying machine is now also selling at its first retail outlet — Apple Stores in North America.
Emerging Tech

Are e-cigarettes safe? Here’s what the most recent science says

Ecigarettes are widely regarded and advertised as a healthier alternative to cigarettes for people who are trying to kick the smoking habit. How safe are these cigarette alternatives? We went deep into the recent scientific literature to…
Emerging Tech

Scientists created a condom that self-lubricates during sex. You’re welcome

Researchers from Boston University have invented a special coating for condoms which make them respond to bodily fluids by becoming more slippery. Here's how their new breakthrough works.