Smart shirt recognizes your exercise movements, vibrates to correct body form

Move Smart Shirt with sensors

There are a huge variety of exercise classes you can take to prepare your body for a summer’s reveal, but for those who prefer to train in privacy of their own homes, a new technology could help you track performance by just putting on a shirt.

Developed by ElectricFoxy, the Move is a technology garment that contain four stretch sensors to recognize your body movements during sports and exercise activities. The sensors read your posture and muscle movements from the shoulders and down your back to correct your body form. If the user does something incorrectly, a haptic feedback vibration alerts them to fix the issue. This is especially helpful for exercises that require precise poses such as yoga and pilates.

Move by ElectricFoxy iOS mobile appsElectricFoxy also notes that Move could also be useful for physical therapy, dance, and even sports like golf and baseball to improve swing stances. The smart tank top can sync with your iOS device through an app that helps track performance. This mobile app contains various sport and exercise options so users can assess, manage, and customize the experience to help them achieve their own personal exercise goals.

Wearing the Move for purposes other than exercise might also be helpful for everyday uses, such as fixing a bad posture or tracking your overall body movement on a daily basis. This way, you can acquire a long term data set to learn about how you use your body and how some actions could lead to back or muscle problems later on. Let’s just hope that the Move’s sensors can withstand sweat for those who perspire a lot during stress and exercise.

There are no words on if or when the Move will be available for purchase, but the idea seems simple enough to market to both male and female crowds in a diverse range of fitness groups. In the mean time, if you’re looking for more smart exercise wear there’s always that Nike+ Fuelband or the Jawbone UP to track your every motion.

Watch the promotional video for the Move smart garment below.

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