This robot will beat you at Rock, Paper, Scissors every time [video]

This robot will beat you at Rock, Paper, Scissors every time

Robots took another step toward total domination of the human race this week with the invention of a new ‘bot that can beat anyone at Rock, Paper, Scissors, 100 percent of the time.

Developed by researchers at the University of Tokyo’s Ishikawa Oku Laboratory, the soulless contraption works by detecting hand movements with a “high-speed vision” camera. The camera then sends its results to the robotic hand, which picks its move to ensure that you lose. And don’t think there’s a way to trick the system — all of this happens in less than the blink of an eye.

“Recognition of human hand can be performed at 1 millisecond with a high-speed vision, and the position and the shape of the human hand are recognized,” the researchers explain on the Ishikawa Oku Lab website. “The wrist joint angle of the robot hand is controlled based on the position of the human hand. The vision recognizes one of rock, paper and scissors based on the shape of the human hand. After that, the robot hand plays one of rock, paper and scissors so as to beat the human being in 1ms.”

Of course, the researchers claim that this technology will be used for good and not the enslavement of the world’s people.

“This technology is one example that show a possibility of cooperation control within a few milliseconds,” write the researchers. “And this technology can be applied to motion support of human beings and cooperation work between human beings and robots etc. without time delay.”

Right… “cooperation.” It’s that kind of sly robotic double-speak that will result in us all tyrannized, probably yoked to some type of hideous energy production facility while the robots galavant around in the homes they’ve stolen from us, having Rock, Paper, Scissors parties, and getting drunk off of antifreeze.

Consider yourself warned.

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