We put Threadsmiths’ hydrophobic t-shirt to the test with water, wine, and ketchup

Hydrophobic materials –that is, materials that reject water at the molecular level– are quickly making their way into the mainstream. Nowadays we’ve got everything from water-resistant smartphones to all-purpose waterproofing sprays. Yet for some reason, hydrophobic clothing has remained somewhat elusive thus far. Why? Because applying hydrophobic coatings to solid, static surfaces is one thing, but applying them onto flexible, dynamic materials that are comfortable to wear is much more difficult.

But an Australian apparel company by the name of Threadsmiths seems to have cracked the code. By emulating the natural hydrophobic properties of the lotus leaf,  the company has created a new stain-proof shirt that can repel just about any water-based liquid

As if that wasn’t awesome enough, Threadsmiths clothing also contains no aerosol applications or dangerous chemicals, so it’s completely safe to wear — as a t-shirt should be. The company’s patented nanotechnology enhances the fabric’s resistance to water and stains, without affecting the natural breathability of the cotton.

To see if these shirts can live up to their high-flying claims, We got our hands on the company’s “Cavalier” t-shirt, and put it to the test with some of the usual stain-causing suspects: Coke, soy sauce, tomato sauce, and wine. Much to our delight, the shirt performed exceptionally.

According to the shirt’s creators, Threadsmiths provides such excellent stain protection by minimizing the surface area available for water and dirt to adhere to. This causes the liquid to bead up and roll off the fabric – creating a natural self-cleaning effect. Amazingly enough, these shirts are completely machine and hand washable. They will also retain there water repellency longer than any hydrophobic spray on the market.

Available at: Amazon

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