TwitterPeek Lets Addicts Stay Up-to-Date @Twitter

By this point, it’s a good bet we all know someone who cant bear to be away from microblogging Twitter for more than a 10 minutes at a time, either checking in on tweets from their friends and followers or chomping at the bit to send out tweets of their own about such earth-shattering topics as breakfast cereal and the funny-looking shoes you-know-who is wearing today. Although darn near every smartphone platform sports a Twitter client, smartphones (and their service plans) aren’t within everyone’s budget. Wouldn’t it be cool if there were a simple device that did nothing but Twitter…and maybe (thinking of parents here) didn’t have all the hazards and complications of a phone?

TwitterPeek

Enter TwitterPeek, a new device from Peek that does nothing—and we mean nothing—besides let users tap into Twitter wirelessly from wherever they are.

The TwitterPeek features a QWERTY keypad for composing messages, and is available in black or aqua blue cases. The device supports one Twitter account at a time—users enter their credentials to get going—and lets people check followers, do @replies, send direct messages, block spam, and more. Users can even tap into TwitPics—images posted along with individual tweets—but no other connectivity is supported: users can’t browse the Web, check email, get directions, or anything else. Peek says the batter should last for about four days on a single charge

TwitterPeek is available in two forms: A $99 version comes with six months of wireless service, after which users will need to pay $7.95 a month for wireless network access. For $199 users can get a TwitterPeek with lifetime wireless access.

Whether even the most ardent twitterers want a dedicated device that taps into their favorite service is debatable: although there are dedicated clients for many devices, users can access the service via Web browsers, and (of course) the whole service was originally set up to support mobile phones via text messages, there are undoubtedly a few folks for whom a dedicated device has a special appeal—it may be an easy sell to parents, and provide busy adults a way to easily segregate the productivity-sink of Twitter from the rest of their digital lives.

Peek also makes the Peek and Peek Pronto, similar devices dedicated to mobile email and text messaging.

The TwitterPeek is available now exclusively from Amazon.com for $99 (for six months of wireless service) or $199 (for lifetime wireless service).

TwitterPeek
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