Wearable music trainer looks like a viral attempt to fight your way to fitness

Wearable music trainer

Trends in wearable fitness bands have brought us items like the Nike+ Fuelband and Jawbone UP, though both those products are made to look minimal and fit seamlessly into your daily outfits. Would you prefer to make a bigger ordeal out of fitness trainer bands? Why not let this thing take up your entire forearm?

The crazy contraption you see above is known as the +++ Wearable Player. It’s a cross between an MP3 player, fitness trainer, and some sort of gaming device all designed to help runners keep in shape. Designed by Michele Tittarelli, the +++ player looks and works like an alien-esque virus. The wearer uploads a playlist onto the band before going out for a run, and the band measures a “beats per minute” (BPM) rating to keep the wearer running at a steady speed to get the song to sound normal. If the wearer slows down, the song begins to slow and distort as well, and stops entirely if the wearer completely pauses.

Wearable Music TrainerThe +++ will also determine if the songs are “good” or “bad” virus by measuring if the BPM is high enough to keep the runner challenged. The model comes with three modes: Fun, Fun+, and Sport to help increase your daily workout goals.

It’s also got a social interaction aspect; if the wearer runs past another person also equipped with the +++, the two songs playing can be accepted to combine. Maybe it’s trying to pull a 500 Days of Summer with the whole meeting strangers by realizing what great musical tastes you both share. Conversely, you might get a stank eye from passerbys who are can hear and judge your guilty pleasure choices.

Alternatively, the wearer can reject the song from strangers or skip their own songs in the playlist by swiping up or down the band. At the end of your run, simply shake the band and the +++ will tally your average BPM and total calories burned to keep track of your exercise. Since it’s made out of flexible plastic-looking material, the band should fit most arm sizes to equip you against bad musical virus.

While the prototype is not yet available as a real product, the design is certainly interesting. First of all, it looks pretty wild and reminds us of a video game weapon. However, we do worry a bit about the possible sweating that could get annoying trapped under that much plastic on our forearm. We still think the overall concept is weird and new, and if the product ever becomes a real item we would definitely give it a go since we do enjoy new ways to look at fitness.

Watch the video below to see how the +++ Wearable Player works in action.

Image Credit: FashioningTech

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