Canon PowerShot A4000 IS Review

While the PowerShot A4000 IS isn’t going to blow any minds, it will fit the bill as a dependable, quality camera for quite a few.
While the PowerShot A4000 IS isn’t going to blow any minds, it will fit the bill as a dependable, quality camera for quite a few.
While the PowerShot A4000 IS isn’t going to blow any minds, it will fit the bill as a dependable, quality camera for quite a few.

Highs

  • Nice, simple control interface
  • Inner-navigation is incredibly simple
  • Just enough extra options to keep exploring

Lows

  • You’re limited with it comes to ISO
  • Average low light performance at best

DT Editors' Rating

Make no mistake, this is an entry-level point and shoot if you’ve ever seen one. At first glance, though, you might be like me and figure you’re getting a higher-end model – it’s got a cleaner, sturdier look and feel to it than many of the budget pocket cams out there, as well as a 16-megapixel sensor and 8x optical zoom. Really, what’s happening is that there isn’t going to be such a thing as the all-auto, bargain-priced point and shoot much longer.

This shift means that the entry-level camera is going to get more expensive and it’s going to do more and last you longer – which is a good thing and a bad thing.

The Canon PowerShot A4000 IS digital camera is a great, if overly simplified entry level point and shoot – but it’s the little things that make this an impressive option for beginners.

Features and design

The PowerShot A4000 IS looks like what we’d expect from Canon: It’s sleek and slim without breaking any size barriers. Sony’s CyberShots have really laid claim to the thin-as-it-gets category, and while this model won’t slide as easily into your pocket, it’s still small and simple.

Its faceplate is completely smooth with no grip, only some unnoticeable text and the flash break up the chrome exterior. On top you’ll find the zoom toggle, power button, and shutter. The back of the PowerShot A4000 IS is largely dominated by its 3-inch LCD; off the side you have a dedicated video capture button, the question mark button (more on that in a moment), your very simple navigation dial, menu, and playback.

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The question mark button is sort of a digital, instant resource for beginners. At any point, on any screen, you can hit it for help navigating the camera or even just to explain what the icons mean and when you should use them. If this is a replacement digital camera, it’s likely you’ll never have to use this feature, but first-timers will appreciate the dead-simple explanations.

Canon’s also packed an array of effects, presets, and filters into the PowerShot A4000 IS. It covers the gamut of possible elements, including (but not limited to) snow, fireworks, and low light. There are also a few filters, including fisheye, miniature, poster effect, and toy camera. You can manipulate the individual settings as well.

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For most buyers, a camera of this caliber means you’ll largely default to Auto shooting, but the manual is so easy to use it deserves mentioning. Under the Program setting, you can determine exposure, ISO, and lighting.

The camera also shoots 720p HD video, and you’re able to use the 8x zoom while you’re recording.

What’s in the box

In addition to the PowerShot A4000 IS, you’ll get the battery, its charger, a wrist strap, USB cable, and digital camera solution software.

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