Olympus E-600 Review

At a list price of $749 for the camera body and two lenses, the Olympus E-600 may contain more bang for your buck than the more fully featured E-620.
At a list price of $749 for the camera body and two lenses, the Olympus E-600 may contain more bang for your buck than the more fully featured E-620.
At a list price of $749 for the camera body and two lenses, the Olympus E-600 may contain more bang for your buck than the more fully featured E-620.

Highs

  • Great Value
  • Retains key features from the E-620

Lows

  • Less features than the E-620

DT Editors' Rating

Introduction

Every so often camera makers decide to strip a few features out of a popular model, lower the price—and like throwing pasta on the wall—hope it sticks—or in this case sells. Enter the Olympus E-600, a modified version of the popular E-620. Both are 12.3-megapixel D-SLRs offering 2.7-inch swiveling LCD screens, Live View, in-body image stabilization and 4 fps shooting.

Features and Design

Where the pair differ—besides price—are some creature and creative functions. Olympus added Art Filters to its D-SLRs which give you some very cool creative effects. When we reviewed the E-620 we really enjoyed Pop Art which added a ‘60s psychedelic feel to images. That camera had six filters but the E-600 has three (Pop Art, Soft Focus and Pin Hole) losing Pale & Light Color, Light Tone and Grainy Film. The last one is the only option we’d shed any tears over. Another lost feature are backlit buttons which come in very handy when you’re shooting in dim light.

The E-600 has a list price of $749 including the body and two lenses (14-42mm and 40-150mm). Given the camera’s 2x digital factor you have a range of 28-300mm which is more than enough for most casual shooters. The more fully featured E-620 is $699 with just a 14-42mm zoom. Olympus didn’t bring in many E-600 kits so they’re harder to find and the company told us inventory is running out. If you’re looking for a post Black Friday camera deal, you might check it out.

Conclusion

At a list price of $749 for the camera body and two lenses, the Olympus E-600 may contain more bang for the buck then the more fully featured E-620.

Highs:

  • Great Value
  • Retains key features from the E-620

Lows:

  • Less features than the E-620
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