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The bestselling consoles of all time

The video game industry is a lucrative business, with some home consoles selling tens of millions of units worldwide. How well each console sold is a great measure of what went right during that particular generation. It’s an effective way to gauge a specific manufacturer’s success, while seeing what gamers gravitated toward — and whether a console has gimmicky features or ideas that stick around.

Before getting into the bestselling consoles, it’s important to note that this list does not include dedicated handhelds. These figures do not account for used system sales since manufacturers don’t have a way to track those transactions (and don’t earn profit from them, anyway).

These systems are also home to some of the bestselling games of all time, which you can check out here.

10. Xbox One ~ 46 million

It might be surprising, but despite “losing” the current generation, Microsoft has still done well with the Xbox One. Even after getting off to such a rough start following the system’s reveal in 2013, the Xbox One was able to turn things around, thanks to its many consumer-friendly features like Xbox Game Pass, Play Anywhere, and Games with Gold. Microsoft has not publicly announced the system’s exact sales figures, but an estimated 46 million have been sold since its release seven years ago.

9. Super Nintendo Entertainment System – 50 million

Many gamers have a soft spot for the SNES — a system that featured some of the most beloved games of all time. Games like Super Mario Kart, Chrono Trigger, Earthbound, Super Metroid, and Super Mario World are just some of the titles you might remember. It took most of what the original NES did well and improved upon it, giving its audience exciting and memorable 16-bit experiences. Though it didn’t sell quite as well as the NES, it still did respectably, and we owe a lot to what this system was able to do in 1991.

8. Nintendo Switch – 55 million

Although the Switch is playable in handheld mode, we’re counting it as a home console — especially since it’s the main system Nintendo is supporting currently. And what a system it is. It’s one of the most unique consoles in history, giving its audience the ability to take it on the go, play it at home, or play in tabletop mode with friends. Not only has it surpassed the sales of the Xbox One, SNES, and others, but it’s done so in record time. According to Nintendo, games for the Switch will continue to release for at least another three years, so it has the potential to surpass the coveted 100 million mark. With tremendous experiences like The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Super Mario Odyssey, and even third-party games like The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, it’s easy to see why it’s done so well.

7. Nintendo Entertainment System – 61 million

Video games would not be what they are today without the NES, period. At the time, it gave consumers a way to have arcade-like experiences at home and revolutionized the idea of video games, in general. Though home consoles existed prior to this, it’s the machine that put them on the map, giving people a way to affordably play games at home. It was also the start of so many beloved franchises we love today, like Zelda, Mario, Metroid, and Mega Man. Other consoles went on to outsell it, but its impact is just as important today as it was over 35 years ago.

6. Xbox 360 – 85 million

Much like the NES and SNES before it, the Xbox 360 revolutionized the way we play games. It popularized HD visuals, providing consumers with stunning experiences that hold up even today. Although other consoles featured online functionality before it, the Xbox 360 made online console gaming much more mainstream. But the games are what truly make this machine shine. Titles like Gears of War, Halo 3, Grand Theft Auto IV, Fallout 3, BioShock, and Mass Effect are just some of the impressive lineup of games this system has. Considering how softly the original Xbox sold, Microsoft struck gold with the Xbox 360.

5. PlayStation 3 – 86 million

As with the Xbox One, the PS3 got off to a rocky start. Telling your audience to get a second job to afford a $600 machine was most definitely not the way to go, but Sony managed to turn things around to outsell the Xbox 360. The PS3 had fantastic ideas, but once again, games are what resonated with its audience. At its peak, the console was pushing indie titles like Journey, Hotline Miami, and Guacamelee!, and its AAA experiences like the Uncharted trilogy, Metal Gear Solid 4, God of War 3, Gran Turismo 5, and The Last of Us gave its audience a reason to buy the console. While it had its shortcomings, the PS3 is an important benchmark in video game history.

4. Nintendo Wii – 101 million

There hasn’t been anything quite like the Wii. It was a system grandma could play. Everyone wanted one, and for the first year or two after it launched, it was sold out everywhere. Though it was aimed at a broader audience, focusing on casual experiences like Wii Sports and Wii Fit, the system still had a handful of games for “core” gamers. The Super Mario Galaxy games are still considered some of the best of all time, while entries like The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess and Skyward Sword are fondly remembered today. Say what you want about the gimmicky motion controls — the Wii was a behemoth that managed to surpass 101 million units sold.

3. PlayStation – 102 million

If you can believe it, the original PlayStation (as we know it) almost didn’t happen. At the time, Nintendo and PlayStation were in talks to partner with one another for the 64-bit console generation. As you can probably guess, it never happened. And we’re so glad it didn’t. Sony went off to create the PlayStation, which is the console many of us grew up with. It featured a breadth of marquee titles like Crash Bandicoot, Spyro, Resident Evil, Tekken, Silent Hill, Metal Gear Solid, and Final Fantasy VII. As one of the first disc-based consoles, it gave its users a way to listen to music via CDs, which likely bolstered its sales, leading to over 102 million units sold.

2. PlayStation 4 – 108 million

Sony got off on the right foot with the PS4. From the very start of its life cycle in 2013, the messaging was clear, the price was right, and the games were (and still are) monumental. It expanded upon the ideas introduced with the PS3, with a higher focus on online fidelity and its user experience. Its lineup of games is arguably one of the strongest in history, with the likes of Bloodborne, God of War, Marvel’s Spider-Man, Red Dead Redemption 2, Persona 5, Uncharted 4, and Horizon Zero Dawn captivating audiences around the globe. What’s fascinating is that the PS4 still has some time left in its life cycle and will likely sell millions more, especially with massive upcoming games on the horizon like The Last of Us Part II.

1. PlayStation 2 – 155 million

By far and away, the best-selling gaming console of all time was the PS2. The sales figures for the PS2 were so massive that it’s unlikely any other console will be able to compare for quite some time. Not only was the PS2 one of the most affordable DVD players at the time, but it also gave you access to more than 3,500 published games. 

With that many options to choose from, gaming had never looked better, and the PS2 held near-universal appeal. Regardless of whether you want to play Gran Turismo 4, Final Fantasy X, Metal Gear Solid 3, God of War, or Grand Theft Auto III, the PS2 had your back. 

One of the reasons why the PS2 sold so well is because it was actively in production for more than ten years. The PS2 built upon the best aspects of the original PlayStation and improved its weak points, leading to the franchises and ideas we know and love today. 

Even as the gaming industry continues to evolve each year, some gaming consoles will remain in our hearts forever. As many of our favorite games come to new-gen consoles in remastered versions or sequels, that simply builds upon our lasting nostalgia. All we can do is wait for the next gaming console that will inevitably change the landscape of the video game industry.

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