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New art for The Last of Us multiplayer spinoff teases its seaside setting

Naughty Dog reaffirmed that it will share more details about The Last of Us’ multiplayer game this year and released new concept art for it. The image gives a better sense of its setting, with a massive boat serving as a key set piece.

The new image shows two players as they approach a giant beached yacht. Rusted vehicles, palm trees, and a flooded street surround them, suggesting that this is in some sort of seaside town. Earlier concept art for the game seemed to indicate a San Francisco setting, though it’s unclear if the new image is from the same location.

While Naughty Dog hasn’t commented on exactly what exactly this concept art is supposed to show, it seems like this is one of the maps where players will be able to fight the Infected and potentially other players. It also looks reminiscent of some of the final areas of The Last of Us Part II.

The second piece of The Last of Us multiplayer concept art shows two players walking toward a beached yacht.

This reassurance of its development and concept art came as part of a blog post on Naughty Dog’s website today meant to kick off the series’ tenth anniversary. “With a team led by Vinit Agarwal, Joe Pettinati, and Anthony Newman, the project is shaping up to be a fresh, new experience from our studio, but one rooted in Naughty Dog’s passion for delivering incredible stories, characters, and gameplay,” Neil Druckmann writes in the blog post.

This multiplayer game has been a long time coming, as it was originally meant to release alongside The Last of Us Part II but was separated to become a standalone release. We haven’t heard that much about it since then, only getting some concept art at Summer Game Fest 2022. As this new concept art looks like it’s from a very different location than the previous art, it seems like this multiplayer game could have multiple maps. 

While it still doesn’t have a release window, we should hear more about it by the end of 2023.

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