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You won’t have to wait long to play Resident Evil 4: The Mercenaries

Capcom has revealed when it will add The Mercenaries to its remake of Resident Evil 4. Fortunately, the wait isn’t that long, as the free DLC will drop on April 7.

We learned that The Mercenaries was coming in two weeks thanks to a tease at the end of the Resident Evil 4 remake’s launch trailer. It doesn’t show any new gameplay or give more details about the mode, simply showing a piece of key art with the free DLC’s release date. The mode was first teased at the end of Resident Evil 4’s trailer during the February State of Play.

Resident Evil 4: The Mercenaries key art.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

This remade version of The Mercenaries hasn’t been seen in action yet, but we know how it worked in the original. Unlocked after beating Resident Evil 4’s main campaign for the first time, The Mercenaries challenged players to earn as many points as possible in just a couple of minutes by killing enemies. The mode focused on Resident Evil 4’s third-person action gameplay, which was pretty groundbreaking at the time of release, encouraging players to do well and rack up combos by killing enemies in quick succession. It also allowed players to unlock and play as other characters not playable in the main story, including Ada Wong and Jack Krauser.

While we don’t know exactly what form this mode will take in the remake, Digital Trends’ Giovanni Colantonio did say Resident Evil 4’s combat “has been entirely revamped for the better,” in his four-and-a-half star review, so that should have a positive impact on The Mercenaries.

The remake of Resident Evil 4 is available now for PC, PS4, PS5, and Xbox Series X/S. The Mercenaries will be added as free DLC on April 7.

Tomas Franzese
Tomas Franzese is a Staff Writer at Digital Trends, where he reports on and reviews the latest releases and exciting…
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