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Everything can be customized in the new Saints Row game

Whereas previous Saints Row games have let players dress up their character however they wanted, the franchise’s upcoming reboot title will take that feature a step further. Saints Row gives players even more control over their boss’s looks, as well as the final say on how their guns, vehicles, and even gang appear throughout the game.

In a lengthy showcase, Saints Row developer Volition detailed the game’s deep customization systems. It all starts with the new boss of the Saints, whom players can make into anyone they want. Customization starts at what has been available in previous games in the franchise — yes, including crotch and breast sliders — and then some. If players want, they can make a true-to-life Shrek, or they can create a boss fitted with running blade prosthetics and pearlescent skin. Every part of the body can be customized, and when it comes to facial features, things don’t have to be symmetrical either. Players can have their boss look like a veritable Picasso painting if they want.

As for dressing their boss, players have more than just a ton of threads to choose from. Layering clothes is a huge part of the game’s fashion system, giving players the option to choose everything their character wears, all the way down to their socks. Of course, the game will still let its players dress a bit outlandishly. Anyone accustomed to Grand Theft Auto Online‘s full wardrobe of clothing options can expect the same vast number of choices in the new Saints Row.

Cars and weapons are also getting the same deep customization options that players can give their characters. All of the game’s guns can be given their own unique paint jobs or get plastered in stickers like a weapon from Call of Duty: Warzone. But to really give weapons their own unique spin, players can just flat out change them into, well, not guns. For instance, instead of a typical RPG, players can fire rockets out of a guitar case instead.

Vehicles can be customized largely in the same way as the player character, with a selection of different paint jobs and finishes to choose from. Of course, rides can also be outfitted with upgrades and special abilities that make them faster, hit harder, or fling passengers out with an ejection seat.

All of these options tie into how players can customize the Saints themselves. As players recruit members, they’ll be given the option to set styles for their gangsters. Whenever they’re called on for help, a squad of nurses or emo rave enthusiasts can pull up in whatever car players want. It’s another part of the spectacle that Saints Rowis offering.

The new Saints Row game is set to launch on August 23 for PlayStation 4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S, and PC.

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Otto Kratky
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Otto Kratky is a freelance writer with many homes. You can find his work at Digital Trends, GameSpot, and Gamepur. If he's…
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Not an evolution

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SAINTS ROW – Game Awards Gameplay Trailer
Grounded absurdism 
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