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Steam adds in-home streaming for Windows, Mac/Linux coming soon

Steam Living Room
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Valve’s Steam PC gaming service juts got a little bit more awesome with the addition of an in-home streaming feature, which allows you to beam whichever Steam game you’re playing from the computer it’s running on to the Steam-connected household screen of your choice. For now, you can only use a Windows machine to host the stream, but Valve promises incoming support for Linux, Mac OS, and SteamOS “soon.”

While you’ll still need to ensure that the target of the stream is a computer capable of running Steam, that’s the only restriction. There isn’t a MacBook Air on the planet that wouldn’t tremble in fear at the thought of running a high-spec Skyrim, but that’s now something you can do, provided the hosting PC is powerful enough.

Setup appears to be simple, as detailed on Steam’s website. Just log into Steam on your host computer, then log into Steam on whichever target you want to stream to. As long as the two computers are on the same network, it should work. You can find more detailed instructions in Valve’s FAQ on the matter.

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Adam Rosenberg
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Previously, Adam worked in the games press as a freelance writer and critic for a range of outlets, including Digital Trends…
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