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How to interrogate enemies in Warzone 2.0

When you and your squad drop into the map for a round of Warzone 2.0, knowledge and teamwork are king. Being a tight, coordinated unit is one thing, but knowing where the enemy is before they know where you are can overcome most skill gaps. Between footsteps, radar, and contracts, there are a lot of methods in Warzone 2.0 held over from the previous Call of Duty games that let you recognize where enemies are, and also one brand new system: interrogations.

Difficulty

Easy

Duration

5 minutes

What You Need

  • Warzone 2.0

Interrogations are lifted from a similar mechanic found in Rainbow Six Siege where you can ping an entire enemy squad on the map, plus any equipment they may have placed down. This is an incredibly powerful tool that anyone can take advantage of, assuming you know how to do it and get away with it. Here's everything you need to know about how to interrogate enemy players in Warzone 2.0.

A soldier being interrogated.

How to interrogate enemies

Interrogating an enemy will ping all their squad mates on the map for you as red dots, and even show them to you as outlines through walls. This is very valuable information, so it does come with some risk to get. Here's how it all works.

Step 1: Find an enemy player in a team-based battle royale match.

Step 2: Use whatever means you have to down them, but not kill them.

Step 3: Get close to the enemy and press the button prompt to Interrogate and Mark Enemy Squad.

Step 4: Hold the button until the bar fills, which takes about five seconds.

Step 5: You are completely defenseless during this period, so try to make sure you're safe and have your team watching your back.

Step 6: Once complete, the rest of that player's team will show up on your map and be visible through walls.

On the flip side, you too can be interrogated while downed. You can save your team exposure by using the Give Up prompt when down if you know you're in a situation where you could be interrogated without interruption.

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