AiroDoctor claims its four-stage air purifier can eliminate coronavirus

As companies seek ways to introduce consumer-grade air purifiers that can kill the coronavirus, the main obstacle that has cropped up is the size of the virus itself. It is too small to be captured by most traditional filters, but AiroDoctor has introduced a commercially focused four-stage air purifier that uses a photocatalytic filter that it claims can destroy or neutralize viruses using UV LEDs.

The AiroDoctor uses a four-stage filter that can capture bacteria and viruses as small as 0.1 microns in size. It is capable of cleaning rooms up to 2,150 square feet with a single unit but runs at only 55 decibels. Because the AiroDoctor does not use UVC light, it doesn’t produce ozone and requires no installation or HVAC integration in order to operate. This new technology means there are no dangerous byproducts from operating it, which is something that UVC filters have struggled to address.

The AiroDoctor is now available in both the United States and Canada for $3,995 per unit. The price is steep, but the units hold a lot of value for businesses that want a way to keep their spaces clean of the coronavirus and other harmful substances in the air.

The AiroDoctor’s claim is backed by scientifically proven test results that show it eliminates more than 99% of all tested viruses, including the coronavirus. It does this thanks to its fourth and final filter. The first three filters include a prefilter, an activated carbon filter, and a HEPA H13 filter, but the final filter is the first of its kind: A UVA LED photocatalytic titanium filter that is capable of destroying viruses and bacteria.

According to AiroDoctor, no other air filter uses this technology. The filter not only captures dangerous aerosols, but it uses a chemical reaction that renders them harmless to humans. As for the scientific test claims, a representative of the company sent us the report conducted by the Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, as well as the Kitasato Institute of Medical Research, which is based in Japan.

Although a vaccine is on the horizon, it will take time before enough people have taken the vaccine to slow the spread of the virus. In the meantime, businesses and customers must still take precautions to keep themselves and their families safe — precautions like wearing a mask, washing their hands, and in some cases, investing in air purifiers that can help keep the air much cleaner.

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