Apple might be making a plus-sized version of the entry-level iPhone SE 2

Apple may be making a larger version of the iPhone SE 2/iPhone 9, according to code found in iOS 14 by 9to5Mac.

This is the first indication we’ve had that Apple is open to the idea of expanding the rumored iPhone SE 2 range, and snippets from the code are hinting at an iPhone with a 5.5-inch display. Past rumors have focused on a model with a 4.7-inch LCD display and upgraded internals, based fairly closely on the design of the iPhone 8. With that in mind, a 5.5-inch display makes it clear we’re looking at a design based on the iPhone 8 Plus, with upgraded hardware to match its smaller sibling.

Apple iPhone 8 review duo diagonal
Julian Chokkattu/Digital Trends

Since the design is likely to be based on the iPhone 8 range, expect to say goodbye to Face ID unlocking and a welcome return to the hardware-based home button with a fingerprint scanner. While it’s likely to seem a step back for those on the cutting edge of tech, the retro look will appeal to anyone who misses the classic iPhone look. However, the new phones are expected to come with Apple’s latest hardware, including the A13 Bionic processor. We assume the new phones will come with the same number of camera lenses as the iPhone 8 range, but expect Apple to have tuned up the hardware for the new entry-level machines. Also rumored is the inclusion of Apple’s new background NFC reading feature, and support for Apple Pay Express Transit.

We’ve been waiting for Apple to make a new version of its wildly sucessful (and well priced) iPhone SE for years, and 2020 is looking like its year. We heard earlier this month it had entered the final stages before launch, and while we don’t know what price an iPhone SE 2 Plus/iPhone 9 Plus might be sold at, rumors say the 4.7-inch version will start from $400. Apple has kept the potential naming scheme for the new phones close to its chest, with both “iPhone SE 2” and “iPhone 9” in the running for consideration. To us, “iPhone 9” seems too inconsistent with Apple’s currently numbering system, but it wouldn’t be the first time the Cupertino, California company has defied expectations. We’ll let you know more as we hear more.

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