Skip to main content

Digital Trends may earn a commission when you buy through links on our site. Why trust us?

Report: Wearable device shipments to surpass 214 million in 2019

apple watch leads smartwatch market 61 percent share android wear gaining ground samsung galaxy gear s ifa wearables
Image used with permission by copyright holder
For those stubbornly adhering to the notion that wearables are a fad, here are some fresh numbers to consider: In 2015, about 80 million wearable devices will be shipped around the world, and in 2016 this figure will rise 44.4 percent to 111.1 million units. Smartwatches will drive much of this increase, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC).

By 2019, total shipments of wearables will hit 214.6 million units, reflecting a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 28 percent. While today’s wearables landscape is limited to basic form factors, we’re on the cusp of a new, wider proliferation of wearables.

“Smarter clothing, eyewear, and even hearables (ear-worn devices) are all in their early stages of mass adoption,” said Jitesh Ubrani, senior research analyst for IDC Mobile Device Trackers. “Though at present these may not be significantly smarter than their analog counterparts, the next generation of wearables [is] on track to offer vastly improved experiences and perhaps even augment human abilities.”

Smartwatches are and will continue to be a popular type of wearble, and in 2016, IDC forecasts 34.3 million smartwatch units to be shipped around the world, up from 21.3 million units shipped in 2015. By 2019, smartwatch shipments will hit 88.3 million units, reflecting a five-year CAGR of 42.8 percent.

Apple’s watchOS for the Apple Watch led all smartwatch operating systems with a 61.3 percent market share. Android Wear followed with 15.2 percent, followed by Pebble OS with 8.6 percent and Samsung’s Tizen with 8.2 percent.

In 2019, IDC expects watchOS to remain the leader with 51.1 percent of the market. However, Android Wear will boast 38.8 percent of the market, reflecting an 80.5 percent CAGR.

Apple Watch Available at: Apple

Editors' Recommendations

Jason Hahn
Jason Hahn is a part-time freelance writer based in New Jersey. He earned his master's degree in journalism at Northwestern…
One of the best Wear OS smartwatches just got a surprise upgrade
The Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 on a person's wrist, showing the backlit secondary screen.

Mobvoi is adding some pizzazz to an otherwise morose color profile for its flagship smartwatch. Starting today, the Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 is now available in a new Sandstone finish, which looks quite premium and refreshing at the same time. The price tag stays the same at $350 in the U.S. market.

So far, the Mobvoi TicWatch Pro 5 has only been available in a single Obsidian black trim, which looks clean, but also happens to be an overly prevalent color. An if you're a fan of sandstone or beige colors on your Wear OS timepiece, your only other option is the Galaxy Watch 5 Pro, which is a generation older and also not particularly easy on the eyes.

Read more
This app gives any smartwatch underwater superpowers
A smartwatch with underwater GPS coordinates.

An app showing underwater positioning data University of Washington

The Global Positioning System — short for GPS — is the most widely-used system for positioning and estimating time by establishing a wireless communication channel with satellites. Smartphones rely on this system, and so do smartwatches, especially those targeted at sports enthusiasts. However, when it comes to underwater activities like scuba diving or deep-sea snorkeling, it’s not of much use.

Read more
This hidden Apple Watch feature is better than I could have imagined
FaceTime call alert.

Apple Watch getting FaceTime caller notification Nadeem Sarwar / Digital Trends

A few days ago, I bravely admitted to my colleagues that I rely on an Android tablet for my daily work. “Nadeem, has anyone told you about PCs,” one of my editors replied. “Good god, man, who hurt you?” remarked another senior editor. They’re not wrong, while I remain as shameless as ever in my experimental preference for work machines.

Read more