Skip to main content

Ericsson bid to ban iPhone sales moves ahead with ITC probe

Ericsson HQ
Image used with permission by copyright holder
Ericsson’s unlikely attempt to have iPhone sales barred in the U.S. has taken a modest step forward. The International Trade Commission, an independent agency that specializes in investigating trade violations, has agreed to look into Ericsson’s claim that Apple infringed on its LTE technology patent.

In its formal complaint, Ericsson accused Apple of violating section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930. The company claims that Apple illegally imported phones and tablets that came loaded with patented technology. With its complaint, Ericsson is requesting the ITC to issue a limited exclusion order and a cease and desist order.

“By instituting this investigation (337-TA-953), the USITC has not yet made any decision on the merits of the case,” the ITC wrote in a press release. “The products at issue in the investigation are certain wireless standard compliant devices including communication devices and tablet computers, including certain Apple iPhones, iPads, and other cellular-enabled products that use the 2G GSM and 4G LTE telecommunications standards.”

Ericsson sued Apple last February. Aside from filing with the ITC, the company also lodged seven complaints with a U.S. District Court in Texas. In total, Ericsson is claiming 41 patent violations in relation to iPhones and iPads.

“Apple’s products benefit from the technology invented and patented by Ericsson’s engineers. Features that consumers now take for granted — like being able to livestream television shows or access their favorite apps from their phone — rely on the technology we have developed. We are committed to sharing our innovations and have acted in good faith to find a fair solution. Apple currently uses our technology without a license and therefore we are seeking help from the court and the ITC,” Kasim Alfalahi, Ericsson’s chief intellectual property officer, said in a press release.

Over the years, Ericsson has formed a reputation for being aggressive with patent litigation. Aside from suing Apple, it has also filed cases against Samsung and Chinese phone maker Xiaomi.

Christian Brazil Bautista
Christian Brazil Bautista is an experienced journalist who has been writing about technology and music for the past decade…
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 6 vs. Z Fold 5: What’s actually different?
The open and closed Samsung Galaxy Z Fold6.

The Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 6 Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

For years now, Samsung has been one of the dominant leaders in the foldable space. Whether you want a compact flip phone or a phone/tablet hybrid, Samsung's Flip and Fold families have a lot to offer. For the latter, the Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 6 is the latest and greatest addition to the lineup.

Read more
Samsung quietly removed this key feature from the Galaxy Watch 7 and Ultra
The Samsung Galaxy Watch Ultra's heart rate sensor.

The Galaxy Watch 7 and the Watch Ultra were launched earlier this week with upgraded internals and a new BioActive Sensor. While the improved sensor is claimed to be more efficient than before, it forced Samsung to remove a key feature previously unique to the Galaxy Watch lineup.

Older Samsung Galaxy Watch models -- including the Galaxy Watch 6 -- could be charged when placed on the back of a Samsung phone that supports wireless charging. This functionality relies on "Wireless power sharing," commonly known as reverse wireless charging, which allows Samsung phones to add battery life to accessories such as earbuds and select Galaxy Watches through wireless charging.

Read more
AT&T just confirmed a massive data breach, and you’re probably affected
AT&T Storefront with logo.

AT&T customers are waking up to some pretty unsettling news. The carrier is alerting its users about a substantial data breach affecting virtually all AT&T subscribers. No, this is not good.

The second-largest carrier in the U.S. has reported that customer data was illegally downloaded from a third-party cloud platform. The downloaded data includes phone call and text message records of "nearly all" AT&T cellular customers from May 1, 2022, to October 31, 2022. The compromised data also includes records from January 2, 2023, for a very small number of customers.

Read more