Skip to main content

The Nio Card is here to help you spend your Bitcoin fortunes

Nio Card
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Smart cards seem to have risen in popularity recently, with the announcement of the well-received Coin card earlier this month being one of the most recent to catch our interest. It’s not the only thing rising either, as the Bitcoin digital currency has also rocketed in value, so it makes sense for someone to bring the two together. Bluenio’s Nio Card is looking for crowd-funding success on Kickstarter at the moment, and will help all those new Bitcoin millionaires spend their fortunes.

The headline feature of the Nio Card is its ability to transfer Bitcoin payments using NFC. A tap of the card against an NFC-enabled smartphone is enough to send or receive BitCoins, and for added security, no transactions are possible unless it’s connected to your smartphone via Bluetooth. No worries about it being stolen and the thief draining your Bitcoin account. As both the card and your phone are linked together, either one will sound an alarm should they drop out of range.

A suite of Nio-specific apps can be accessed on your phone, including ones which control the alert and remote location features, plus customizable reminders and a secure locker for personal information. A software development kit will be supplied to developers, so expect more apps to come in the future. Thanks to various sensors built into the Nio Card, it could potentially become a fitness tracker, or a key to open NFC-secured doors. 

In the future, Bluenio wants to sign-up Google Wallet and PayPal, expanding the wireless payments option beyond Bitcoin. However, if a retailer near you takes Bitcoin through a wireless terminal, there’s a good chance the Nio Card will work straight away.

The anodised metal card is 4mm thick and around the same size as a regular credit card, so it’ll fit in your wallet. It comes with 2GB of storage space for any data you’d like to securely store, and the battery should last for nine months before needing a recharge. The card costs $65 and is expected to launch in March next year. Whether your Bitcoins will still have any value at that time, remains to be seen.

Editors' Recommendations

Andy Boxall
Senior Mobile Writer
Andy is a Senior Writer at Digital Trends, where he concentrates on mobile technology, a subject he has written about for…
I compared two of the year’s best phones in an extreme camera test
The Apple iPhone 15 Pro Max and the Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra's rear panels.

Apple iPhone 15 Pro Max (left) and the Samsung Galaxy S23 Ultra. Andy Boxall / Digital Trends

Apple versus Samsung is perhaps the ultimate battle in smartphones, and the iPhone 15 Pro Max and the Galaxy S23 Ultra are the two brand’s top devices. If you want one, you may have also looked at the other, and even if not, who doesn’t want to see a tough camera battle between these two heavyweights?

Read more
reMarkable 2 digital notebook just got a rare discount
A person using the reMarkable 2 to take notes.

The reMarkable 2, a tablet that mimics the feel of writing and reading on paper, is available from Best Buy right now with a rare $50 discount on a bundle that includes the Marker Plus writing instrument and the Book Folio case. Instead of $550, you'll only have to pay $500, which is still fairly expensive but it's very much worth it. We're not sure how much time is remaining on the offer though, so if you think this will be a better purchase than other tablet deals, you should push through with the transaction as soon as possible.

Why you should buy the reMarkable 2 paper tablet
The reMarkable 2, the successor to 2017's reMarkable, improves upon the premise of the original version of the tablet -- it's like a pen and paper with smart capabilities. There's no backlight or glare on the display of this device for an eye-friendly reading experience, much like reading from real paper, and there are no distractions so you can focus on your work. In comparison, using a stylus on a tablet feels unnatural because of the friction-less glass, while the bright screen will strain your eyes and the notifications from your apps will keep distracting you.

Read more
This strange accessory did something amazing to my iPad
Person working on iPad Pro with Xreal Air 2 connected.

Apple has been trying to sell the idea of using an iPad — the Pro model, specifically — as a legitimate computing machine for a while. It started with putting a Mac-borrowed M-series silicon inside the tablet, followed by bringing Stage Manager to the tablet.

Then came desktop-grade productivity apps like Final Cut Pro, Logic Pro, and Da Vinci Resolve, preceded by Microsoft 365 and Adobe’s editing tools. The ability to plug in an external monitor is also neat for a tablet, but that restricts you to a table.

Read more