Skip to main content

OtterBox warns customers about OtterSpot battery swelling

OtterBox has confirmed that a percentage of original OtterSpot wireless chargers may experience battery swelling. The company reassured customers that while some issues have been reported, there’s no danger in the swelling charging stations thanks to “internal safeguards” that prevent major malfunctions, meaning that devices presumably won’t explode or catch fire. The problem is only reportedly present in OtterSpots sold during a small window of 2019 when the stackable charging devices were first released.

Customers who purchased the original run of OtterSpots between July and August 2019 may notice the issue in their devices. The problem may be more prominent in chargers “under multi-stack and higher temperature conditions,” OtterBox said in a statement to The Verge. Despite the issue, OtterBox hasn’t recalled any devices, but the company is willing to replace OtterSpots that are experiencing the issue.

OtterBox has given a list of serial numbers for devices that could be defective, so even if an owner isn’t currently seeing any signs of battery swelling, it’s not a bad idea to check and see if a device is at risk. The company says that if an OtterSpot’s serial number starts with 229, 250, or 259, the device could be at risk. Those with defective charging stations can call the company’s customer service phone number (1-855-688-7269) and request a free replacement.

Luckily, it seems as if there won’t be too many affected devices as OtterBox confirmed that the OtterSpot was sold at limited retailers when it first launched. This means that the largest OtterBox retailers such as the Apple Store, Best Buy, and Target wouldn’t have sold any of the defective chargers, giving some peace of mind to many owners who purchased their devices through major outlets. It’s still not a bad idea to double-check the serial number to make sure that older charging stations won’t be affected, even if it was purchased through big retailers.

Editors' Recommendations

Peter Hunt Szpytek
A podcast host and journalist, Peter covers mobile news with Digital Trends and gaming news, reviews, and guides for sites…
6 reasons why you shouldn’t buy the iPhone 15
A green iPhone 15 lock screen.

The Apple iPhone 15 series was introduced last year and includes the iPhone 15, iPhone 15 Plus, iPhone 15 Pro, and iPhone 15 Pro Max. These are Apple's latest phones until the iPhone 16 series is announced this fall.

The iPhone 15 would typically be an excellent choice for users who don't require all the additional features of the iPhone 15 Pro series. However, there are several reasons why you should no longer consider this phone. Some of these reasons are related to the phone itself, while others are associated with where we are on Apple's iPhone release schedule.

Read more
Snapchat Planets: What’s the order, and what do they mean?
Snapchat Planets being shown on the Snapchat app on iPhone.

Snapchat is one of the most popular social/messaging apps around. We all know you can use it to send photos and videos to friends, watch their Stories, and follow content from other creators. But do you know about Snapchat Planets?

You may already be familiar with Snapchat Planets if you use Snapchat Plus. If you're not, it might be a reason to try out Snapchat's premium features. It is available through the Snapchat app on any mobile device, such as the Google Pixel 8 or iPhone 15.
What are Snapchat Planets?

Read more
The Mokibo Fusion 2.0 is unlike any iPad keyboard I’ve ever used
Mokibo Fusion 2.0 keyboard attached to iPad Pro.

As far as tablets go, keyboards fall in a rather weird class of accessories. For some, they are a must, while others don’t require anything more than taps, touch, and a bit of stylus action for both work and play. But that class also has its own schism. Can they live without a trackpad, or does their workflow make it to the finish line with a little assistance from touchscreen gestures?

But the rule isn’t universal. When you’ve got an iPad Pro in your hands, or even the significantly cheaper iPad Air with M-series silicon, you mean business. Or at least that was likely the intention when plunking over a thousand dollars on a tablet in hopes of getting some serious computing work done. For that kind of workflow, you need to get as close to a “real” keyboard -- one that offers at least a half-decent trackpad.

Read more