Weekly Rewind: Mars by 2018, a tragedy at Apple, and floating houses

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In the tech world, a lot happens in a week. So much news goes on that it’s almost impossible for mere mortals with real lives to keep track of everything. That’s why we’ve compiled a quick and dirty list of the top 10 tech stories from this week. Everything from floating houses to whether you really need to buy premium gasoline, it’s all here.

Stories: 1-5

Would you live in a floating home that looks like a UFO?

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Known for its exquisite cuisine, prominent fashion scene, and storied football clubs, Italy will soon have the ability to add yet another notable notch to its esteemed culture belt: manufacturer of UFOs. Also known as Unidentified Floating Objects, the UFOs coming to Italian shores in the near future aren’t exactly alien but rather an innovative solution for fighting the high costs of rent and the impending rise of the world’s sea levels. Artistically designed by the Italy-based company Jet Capsule, the floating concept is a small autonomous vessel that’s essentially a studio apartment on water. If you get seasick easy, we don’t recommend hopping on board to invest.

Read the full story here.

Employee found dead on Apple campus identified; company offers sympathies

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The Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office is investigating after a dead body and firearm were found in a conference room at Apple’s Cupertino, California, headquarters Wednesday morning. The Santa Clara County Medical Examiner has now officially ruled the death a suicide and identified the Apple employee as 25-year-old Edward Mackowiak, according to The Mercury News. As of this writing, Apple has not revealed Mackowiak’s role in the company.

Read the full story here.

India calls for a ‘panic button’ on phones to help protect women

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The media spotlight on India’s violent crimes against women during the past few years hasn’t made it any safer — the country reported 337,922 crimes against women in 2014, which includes more than 36,000 rapes, according to Reuters. A temporary solution, the Indian government believes, is to create a way for women to feel a little more at ease. The government is calling for all mobile phones sold starting in January 2017 to have a panic button as well as GPS.

Read the full story here.

Apple sees first year-over-year revenue decline in 13 years on falling iPhone, Mac sales

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Apple has posted its second quarter earnings for 2016, and it shows the first year-over-year revenue decline in 13 years. Apple’s revenue for the second quarter, which ended in March, was $50.6 billion, a 13 percent decline from last year. The quarter’s net income also went down from last year’s $13.6 billion to 10.5 billion, which comes out to be $1.90 a share. The company’s gross margin dipped from 2015’s 40.8 percent, to 39.4 percent.

Read the full story here.

HBO’s strategy for streaming domination just had a monster weekend

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As any Game of Thrones fan can attest, last weekend was an absolute monster one for HBO, as the beloved fantasy series made its season premiere alongside fan favorites Veep and Silicon Valley. But the weekend that was marked much more than just the return of some of HBO’s biggest shows. This was a blitzkrieg assault aimed directly at the HBO’s biggest rivals in the battle for all-out streaming supremacy.

Read the full story here.

Stories: 6-10

FBI will not disclose technique used to unlock shooter’s iPhone

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Apple will never know the vulnerability that allowed professional hackers, paid by the FBI, to break into the San Bernardino, California, shooter’s iPhone. Amy Hess, the bureau’s executive assistant director for science and technology, issued a statement confirming the widespread belief that the FBI will not disclose the method used to hack the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone. Bugs discovered by federal agencies are typically reported to the Vulnerabilities Equities Process.

Read the full story here.

Microsoft interrupted a live broadcast to recommend Windows 10

Tired of those Windows 10 reminders popping up constantly on your computer? So was Iowa meteorologist Metinka Slate, after it interrupted her live weather update. “Oh, Microsoft recommends Windows 10,” she said — on camera –after noticing the message, clearly annoyed but also trying to laugh it off. “What should I do?”

Read the full story here.

Do you really need to buy premium gasoline?

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Old folks may say that they don’t build cars like they used to, but the fact is, by any measure except perhaps styling, today’s cars are far better than anything that came before. A modern car delivers reliability, performance, and fuel economy that prior generations could only dream about. The only cars better than the ones we have today are the ones we’ll have next year, and the year after that.

Read the full story here.

Elon Musk wants to send a rocket to Mars — and he wants to do it before 2018

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After weeks of teases, SpaceX has finally announced its official plans to send a spacecraft to Mars by 2018, marking the first step in founder Elon Musk’s plans to colonize our cosmic neighbor. The private space corporation’s official Twitter account tweeted the announcement Wednesday morning. According to the announcement tweet, SpaceX will be using the Red Dragon as the spacecraft for the mission.

Read the full story here.

‘To be left behind in tech is to be left behind.’ Jesse Jackson on digital diversity

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Carrying nothing more complex than a little, black Motorola flip phone, the Rev. Jesse Jackson isn’t the most technological guy out there. But after more than a half-century fighting for civil rights, he knows injustice when he sees it and he’s an expert at bringing about change. And that’s exactly what he’s doing to the tech industry.

Read the full story here.

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