United partners with Apple, IBM to offer a mobile solution to your flying woes

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Your high-flying experience is about to go high-tech. On Thursday, IBM, United Airlines, and Apple announced a collaboration that aims to serve up a new generation of mobile apps for United employees. With hopes of “unleashing the power of the more than 50,000 iOS devices,” IBM and Apple seek to redefine how work is done, starting at United Airlines. Promising a new suite of made-for-business apps, the lineup will be aimed at driving the airline’s digital transformation and helping customer service.

“United Airlines is committed to delivering positive traveler experiences that begin with front-line engagements during all points of the passenger journey — from check-in to departure to destination,” said Dee Waddell, global managing director, for travel and transportation industries at IBM. “This enhanced strategy with mobile solutions from IBM and Apple allows United Airlines employees to tap into the right information at the right time to instantaneously address the needs that matter most to passengers.”

Technology has long played an integral role in United’s strategy. Particularly over the last few years, United has equipped its employees with iPhones and iPads to create a more seamless customer experience. “We want to put our employees in a position to deliver exceptional service at every step of the travel experience,” said Jason Birnbaum, United’s vice president of operations technology. “We have incredible employees out in the field who rely on technology to help our customers. The mobile solutions and working closely with IBM and Apple enables us to provide innovative solutions for them on an unprecedented scale.”

With the new apps, flight attendants ought to have a better sense of which customers have connecting flights, so they can better help them find their gates. Customer service agents will also have more autonomy in moving around, rather than being tied to their desks. So get excited, friends. Technology just may make your travel experience that much better.

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