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What is Fanfix? Everything you need to know about the Patreon rival

In the new age of online creators, fans are always looking for new ways they can support their favorite content. Websites like Patreon have allowed them to do just that by giving fans a direct way to monetarily support creators while also being given exclusive content in exchange for their support. A new site named Fanfix has been making waves recently as a new way for creators to connect with their audiences and receive more monetary support.

As with all new sites that handle money exchanges, some people have been a little skeptical about going all-in with Fanfix. While that caution is always a good instinct, there doesn’t seem to be much reason to be suspicious of the site from a legitimacy perspective. That said, here’s everything you need to know about Fanfix and what the platform offers.

What is Fanfix?

An image of a Fanfix post that shows a woman taking a mirror selfie with various direct messages floating around her.
Fanfix

As mentioned above, Fanfix is a website that’s devoted to providing a new way for content creators to connect with their fans by providing exclusive, behind-the-scenes content gated behind a paywall. Creators are able to set their own prices for their exclusive feeds as well as being able to monetize their DMs by setting pay-per-message prices and virtual tip jars for their posts.

Fanfix is a site that’s meant to be exclusively for relatively large creators, as it’s required for a creator to have at least 10,000 followers across all of their social media platforms in order to set up a page. This means that you won’t be finding any smaller creators on the site, so you’ll have to find other ways to support them as they won’t be able to be hosted on Fanfix.

All-in-all, it works like most other social media apps, namely Instagram, but gates its content behind a paywall and is exclusively for successful content creators

How much does Fanfix pay creators?

An image of an iPhone with a Fanfix feed on it. The posts are locked behind paywalls.
Fanfix

Fanfix offers creators an 80-20 revenue split on all purchases. The site says that it uses its percentage of the earnings to “cover operations and maintain the platform.” As mentioned above, creators are able to set their prices for their feeds and DMs, so the revenue split may impact how high the prices creators charge will be.

For comparison, Patreon has a flexible revenue split that changes depending on the services that creators opt in for but the fee ranges from 5% to 12% which makes Fanfix’s 20% cut a little steep.

How is Fanfix different from Patreon and OnlyFans?

Patreon logo.
Patreon

In terms of being similar to other platforms, Fanfix seems to be taking a lot of queues from OnlyFans. Fanfix and OnlyFans share the same 80-20 revenue split, follow a lot of Instagram’s design principles, and have a very similar monetization model where content creators set a price for their feed, have virtual tip jars, and can charge fans to DM them. The two main differences between the two, however, are that Fanfix requires its creators to have previously popular social media accounts before signing up and the site is completely safe for work. On the site’s brief FAQ page, it clearly states that explicit content and nudity are “not allowed” which sets it apart from OnlyFans which functions essentially as a pay-per-view adult-content site.

Patreon is fairly different from Fanfix. For starters, it offers multiple tiers of support meaning that fans are able to support creators for different amounts of money as opposed to a flat rate for their content feed. Additionally, the content on Patreon tends to be more diverse than what’s on Fanfix. Fanfix allows creators to share pictures and videos with their subscribers while Patreon supports them as well but can also be a place for podcasts, community polls, live streams, and more.

Because anyone can make a Patreon page, it’s also a lot more creator-friendly since there are no required audience sizes in order to get started. Additionally, the revenue split on Patreon is also more creator-friendly as outlined in the section above. Patreon also allows explicit content and nudity, but unlike OnlyFans, it has a much wider focus than simply being a place for explicit content.

How to download the Fanfix app

A picture of the Fanfix website on a smartphone.
Peter Szpytek/Digital Trends

Fanfix doesn’t currently have an app on the iOS App Store, nor the Google Play Store on Android. There isn’t much mention of whether a devoted app is coming soon or even in the works; however, there is a way to make an app on your home screen for it using a backdoor method.

To do it, head to fanfix.io on your phone’s internet browser. On Android devices, tap the three vertical dots in the top right corner, then select Add to Home Screen from the dropdown menu. Type in a name that you want to add for the shortcut, then select Add, then Add again. On iOS, select the share icon on the bottom of the screen, then Add to Home Screen. Type in the name you want for the shortcut and then select Add in the top right corner.

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Peter Hunt Szpytek
A podcast host and journalist, Peter covers mobile news with Digital Trends and gaming news, reviews, and guides for sites…
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