Skip to main content

Lawsuit over Capital One data breach could eventually get you sweet revenge

If you were affected by the massive Capital One data breach, you might be entitled to cash down the line thanks to a new class-action lawsuit being filed against the company.

The Miami-based law firm Colson Hicks Eidson filed a class-action lawsuit Tuesday against Capital One Financial Corporation “for negligence in failing to safeguard consumers’ personal information” in the recent data breach that impacted 100 million consumers. It’s not clear what will come with the lawsuit down the line, but a massive settlement could be seen as a significant deterrent against companies that don’t do enough to safeguard personal data. And it could net you a couple of bucks — if you were affected. 

“Capital One was reckless and completely disregarded the rights of consumers by failing to implement and maintain adequate data security measures and therefore exposed information to criminals for misuse,” said Lewis S. Mike Eidson, co-counsel for the plaintiffs. “Through this lawsuit, we hope to prevent a re-occurrence of a similar data breach, which has caused tremendous grief and compromised the financial standing and credit scores for so many.”   

If you missed the story of the breach, the short version is that thanks to a faulty firewall, a hacker was able to gain access to the bank’s cloud repository in March of 2019. That hacker collected the personal information from roughly 100 million Capital One customers’ credit card applications, authorities said. The hacker then allegedly posted information about the breach their GitHub account in the middle of April, making it potentially available to others who could use it in nefarious ways.

The alleged hacker, Paige A. Thompson was arrested in July for the hack. She previously worked for Amazon Web Services (AWS) which handles Capital One’s cloud database.

At the time of the announcement of the hack, Capital One said that it is unlikely that the information was used for fraud or disseminated by this individual,” but it had plans to continue to investigate.

Despite that timeline, Capital One did not alert its customers of the breach until July 29, 2019. The information in question was also still available online until at least July 17, 2019 when the bank was notified by an anonymous tipster.

If you’re worried that you were affected by the hack — and there’s a good chance you were, considering how big it was — there are a number of steps you can take to protect yourself.

Capital One has said that it will be notifying those impacted by the hack “through a variety of channels.” We reached out to the company for comment on the class-action lawsuit, and will update this story if we heard back. 

The lawsuit was filed in Federal Court in the Eastern District of Virginia on behalf of plaintiffs Maria de Lourdes Tester and Tracy Elizabeth Masi.

Editors' Recommendations

Emily Price
Emily is a freelance writer based in San Francisco. Her book "Productivity Hacks: 500+ Easy Ways to Accomplish More at…
AMD’s new CPU slammed as ‘anti-consumer at best’
The AMD Ryzen 7 5700 propped up against an action figure.

AMD makes some of the best processors, but this one is most likely not one of them. According to a video review of the recently released Ryzen 7 5700, the CPU is not only a letdown -- it's downright misleading. Compared to previous non-X Ryzen processors, the 5700 appears to be significantly cutdown, which affects its performance in a big way.

Historically, AMD's non-X Ryzen CPUs were pretty much the same as their X counterparts, but with slightly lower clock speeds. Take the Ryzen 5 5600 and the Ryzen 5 5600X, for example. Both chips have six cores and 12 threads, as well as 32MB of cache, but the Ryzen 5 5600 has a clock speed of 4.4GHz, while the 5600X hits 4.6GHz. As a result, many chose the non-X part due to it being slightly cheaper while not being a major downgrade.

Read more
Nvidia just fixed a major issue with its GPUs
The Nvidia RTX 4080 Super on a pink background.

If you've been unhappy with the performance of your graphics card lately, you might want to check out Nvidia's latest beta driver. This is a hotfix driver, which is pretty unusual for Nvidia, but it can be helpful if you've been dealing with micro-stuttering, both in games and on the desktop. The update addresses four issues in total, but to get it, you'll have to dig a little deeper than the standard path of updating your drivers.

Nvidia typically bundles bug fixes with its usual Game Ready drivers, as urgent hotfixes tend to be few and far between. However, this time, Nvidia chose not to wait any longer and pushed four updates for its GPU range. The new driver version, 551.46, may fix annoying stuttering issues.

Read more
CableMod’s adapters damaged up to $74K worth of Nvidia GPUs
Melted 12VHPWR connector made by CableMod for the RTX 4090.

CableMod's adapters were meant to fix the problem of melting connectors on Nvidia's top GPU, the RTX 4090, but it appears that things didn't go as planned. The Consumer Product Safety Commission has posted a notice that the CableMod 12VHPWR angled adapters are being recalled due to fire and burn hazards. More than 25,300 adapters are to be returned, and the affected customers are eligible for a full refund.

The connectors on the RTX 4090 have been melting ever since the GPU hit the shelves in late 2022, and so far, the only fix seems to lie in careful installation and picking the right PC case that can accommodate this monstrous card. CableMod's angled adapters showed a lot of promise, at least initially. Seeing as bending the cable can contribute to the overheating, an angled adapter should have been just the fix -- but unfortunately, the melting continued, even with the use of CableMod's solution.

Read more