John McAfee: For today, for the future — here’s why I’m running for president

John McAfee
John McAfee
John McAfee is one of the most influential commentators on cybersecurity anywhere in the world. His new venture — Future Tense Central — focuses on security and personal privacy-related products. McAfee provides regular insight on global hacking scandals and internet surveillance, and has become a hugely controversial figure following his time in Belize, where he claims to have exposed corruption at the highest level before fleeing the country amid accusations of murder (the Belize government is currently not pursuing any accusations against him).

This is not politics as usual. It is not in my nature, and it is not in our best interests.

The last few days have been amazing. I am humbled by the outpouring of support and encouragement that I have received. I did 27 interviews yesterday and today looks to be about the same. I have found that the issues we are bringing up are resonating. America cares about these things. Officially, my complete presidential platform is forthcoming, but I wanted to share on Digital Trends a number of reasons why I am running for president and founding a party.

Our government is in a dysfunctional state. It is also illiterate when it comes to technology.

Technology is not a tool that should be used for a government to invade our privacy. Technology should not be the scapegoat when we fail to protect our digital assets and tools of commerce. These are matters of priorities.

“Our country is not prepared for a cyberwar that has already begun. I can change that.”

We live in a world that is defined by technology, and in these times, we need leadership that truly understands this responsibility and the opportunity that lies before us.

Our country is not prepared for a cyberwar that has already begun. We haven’t seen anything yet. It is not ready to protect the precious assets of technology that we depend on as a people. We fail at that at an alarming rate. It is not ready to protect our infrastructure, which sits on a precipice of threats. I can change that. I will change that, and it has to happen.

Our government was designed to be for the people, by the people. Somehow, we have strayed from these original designs. Today’s government is about powerful people and powerful conglomerates of corporations and lobby groups. Americans have been brought to their knees by this Orwellian machine. If you think you’re not a subject or it doesn’t affect you, look at our debt. Our future has been pre-spent and sold. We should all be outraged, and many are.

Years ago, in an environment where the computer industry was faced with a coming reality of threats, I started a computer security company and an industry was born. How innocent we were.

An entire sea of threats is lurking today, and it endangers all of us. Our failures to deal with this are based on policy, on economics, on a lack of efficiency, and a lack of priorities. This is where the Cyber Party comes in.

“Demand more from your government. Demand honesty. Demand freedom.”

The Cyber Party is the spark we need to awaken the people from their deep slumber. Demand more from your government. Demand honesty. Demand freedom.

The goal is to bring these issues to light not only today, but long after this generation of people are gone. You are a person. You are human. You have rights. The world has changed and as time goes on, the effects of technology in our lives will only become more pronounced. You have a chance to dictate whether technology is used against you or whether it is used for the good of all.
If you care about security, if you care about privacy, if you care about an efficient government that is not beholden to massive buyouts, then we have something in common.

Finally, I would like to add that not only will we get action on these matters, I can assure you that we will win.

Visit us at www.mcafee16.com and visit our party at www.cyberparty.org.

The views expressed here are solely those of the author and do not reflect the beliefs of Digital Trends.

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