Fujifilm pulls firmware update after software renders lenses useless with some bodies

fujifilm pulls lens firmware for glitch 55479062 ml
Mettus
Fujifilm took a firmware update offline today after identifying a big compatibility issue. The firmware update for the XF 90mm f/2 and 16-55mm f/2.8 lenses, when paired with some camera bodies, causes a lens error, preventing the glass from communicating with the camera.

The issue stems from using the updated lens on a camera body with outdated firmware, Fujifilm says. When the lens is used with a camera with outdated firmware, the LCD will blink with a lens error message. According to the company, if the lens error issue doesn’t appear immediately after using the updated lens, the pair can continue to be used without the issue popping up in the future.

The company says it is working on updating the lens firmware so that, even paired with a camera with an older firmware version, the lens will function as expected. The corrected firmware is expected out on July 21.

The firmware in question, released on June 9, improves the accuracy of the manual focus for both the 90mm and 16-55mm lenses. In the updating instructions, Fujifilm specifically states that the lens firmware should be conducted after the camera is also updated.

Still, the update should help shooters rest a little easier knowing a software upgrade isn’t going to give them a lens error if they didn’t install it in the correct order. According to the license agreement, Fujifilm doesn’t offer a warranty on their firmware upgrades.

The affected models include cameras with older firmware, including the X-A1 (firmware Ver. 1.20 and older), X-A2 (1.01), X-E1 (2.40), X-E2 (3.01), X-M1 (1.20), X-Pro1 (3.41), X-T1 (4.0) and X-T10 (1.01). The X-Pro2 and X-E2S bodies are not affected, likely because the newer bodies have newer software.

Fujifilm isn’t the only camera manufacturer lately to release firmware to correct errors either — both Canon and Nikon have identified card compatibility issues with some of their latest DSLRs and Sigma lenses also need a firmware update for compatibility with the Canon 1DX Mark II.

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