Skip to main content

Facebook reveals we upload a whopping 350 million photos to the network daily

according to facebook there are 350 million photos uploaded on the social network daily and thats just crazy pile of polaroid
Image used with permission by copyright holder

When Internet.org released a white paper this week detailing – among other things – Facebook’s technologies and tools the company has developed in order to plug the whole world into the Matrix get the entire world online, it also gave us a sneak peek into the sort of data they handle on a daily basis. And to no one’s surprise, one of the things we love using Facebook for the most is – gasp! – uploading and sharing photos.

“More than 250 billion photos have been uploaded to Facebook, and more than 350 million photos are uploaded every day on average,” the social network revealed. A number of that magnitude may be a bit shocking at first, but given how a lot of Facebook users access the site via their smartphones coupled with how dependent we are on this device as a camera, the numbers make sense. Also to not be ignored is the fact that Facebook owns Instagram, a quickly growing app – from which plenty of users push photos to Facebook.

“Facebook is the largest image-sharing site on the Internet, and images represent the largest source of data usage on Facebook,” the white paper stated. The average Facebook user’s love for photography is the reason why the social network acquired Instagram and why it continually improves the photo-sharing experience, most recently through the site’s new Shared Albums feature that allows contacts to collaborate and collate images in one album. It is because of this that efforts to optimize photo uploads on the site in terms of resolution and format is in progress, all for the overall goal of efficiency.

The information Facebook provided about the number of photos they house on the company servers is only a small piece of an even more gigantic pie. Everyday, according to the paper, there are over 4.75 billion items shared on Facebook all over the world, including status updates, wall posts, photos, videos, and comments. Additionally, over 4.5 billion Likes are unleashed into the Facebook ether on a daily basis, along with more than 10 billion messages. No wonder it has to build such massive data centers; we’re becoming virtual pack rats. 

[Image via Flickr]

Editors' Recommendations

Jam Kotenko
Former Digital Trends Contributor
When she's not busy watching movies and TV shows or traveling to new places, Jam is probably on Facebook. Or Twitter. Or…
X (formerly Twitter) returns after global outage
A white X on a black background, which could be Twitter's new logo.

X, formerly known as Twitter, went down for about 90 minutes for users worldwide early on Thursday ET.

Anyone opening the social media app across all platforms was met with a blank timeline. On desktop, users saw a message that simply read, "Welcome to X," while on mobile the app showed suggestions for accounts to follow.

Read more
How to create multiple profiles on a Facebook account
A series of social media app icons on a colorful smartphone screen.

Facebook (and, by extension, Meta) are particular in the way that they allow users to create accounts and interact with their platform. Being the opposite of the typical anonymous service, Facebook sticks to the rule of one account per one person. However, Facebook allows its users to create multiple profiles that are all linked to one main Facebook account.

In much the same way as Japanese philosophy tells us we have three faces — one to show the world, one to show family, and one to show no one but ourselves — these profiles allow us to put a different 'face' out to different aspects or hobbies. One profile can keep tabs on your friends, while another goes hardcore into networking and selling tech on Facebook Marketplace.

Read more
How to set your Facebook Feed to show most recent posts
A smartphone with the Facebook app icon on it all on a white marble background.

Facebook's Feed is designed to recommend content you'd most likely want to see, and it's based on your Facebook activity, your connections, and the level of engagement a given post receives.

But sometimes you just want to see the latest Facebook posts. If that's you, it's important to know that you're not just stuck with Facebook's Feed algorithm. Sorting your Facebook Feed to show the most recent posts is a simple process:

Read more