Ello legally binds itself to remaining an ethical, ad-free social network, forever

ello legally binds remaining ethical ad free social network forever homepage
New social network on the block, Ello, has sent out a memo telling subscribers – both current and future – not to worry, it’s sticking to its original plan, and will always offer an “ethical” ad-free social experience, forever. It’s not messing around either, and has converted itself into a Public Benefits Corporation, which forces it to abide by rules laid down in a charter.

Related: Ello says it’s an ad-free network that won’t mine your data

The rules are as follows: Ello will never make money from selling ads, nor will it make money from selling user data, and should it ever be sold on to another company, the new owners must also stick to these rules. These aren’t guidelines, but legal requirements. As a Public Benefit Corporation, Ello commits to “benefitting society as a whole, not just to make money for its investors.” Ello’s decision comes after raising $5.5 million from venture capitalists.

Without ads, how does Ello intend to make money? According to the New York Times, it has plans to introduce an app store, where widgets and add-ons will be sold to let users customize the site and individual profiles. Instant messenger app Line operates a similar system, where the sale of stickers, apps, and other items earned it around $338 million in 2013.

Launched in March this year, Ello began capturing attention when Facebook and Twitter introduced unpopular methods to make money, or enforced unpopular rules. Privacy, and what social networks do with the data they store, has long been a hot topic, and Ello’s refreshing take ensured it made headlines.

However, Ello’s rapid rise may not continue for long. It’s still not possible to join the network without an invitation, and statistics show initial interest in the site has wained. Ello sent the new memo to all its subscribers, plus those on its waiting list, but the latter group would probably prefer a way to actually try the network out, than read about what makes it worthwhile.

Gaming

Google Stadia is the upcoming Netflix for games that will hurt game creators

Google Stadia promises a world where gaming is more convenient than ever, but it’s a future that will damage the way people make games.
Home Theater

Banish the buffer screen with these tips for silky smooth streaming video

If you’ve been having troubles with streaming Internet videos from Netflix and other services in HD, the problem may be your network. Here’s how to make sure your streaming video experience goes smoothly.
Computing

The number pad on HP’s Chromebook 15 makes spreadsheet work a breeze

HP's Chromebook 15 comes with a 15.6-inch display, a metal keyboard deck with full-size keys, and a dedicated number pad, making it the second Chromebook model, following Acer's Chromebook 715, to be suited for spreadsheet work.
Home Theater

New TV? Here's where to go to watch the best 4K content available

Searching for content for your new 4K UHD TV? Look no further. We have every major source of the best 4K content, along with the cost, hardware requirements, and features that make each service worth a look.
Social Media

Looking to officially rid your inbox of Facebook messages? Here's how

Deleting messages from Facebook Messenger is almost as easy as scrolling through your News Feed. Here, we show you how to delete an entire conversation or a single message, both of which take seconds.
Social Media

LinkedIn: Now you can express love, curiosity, and more with new Reactions

LinkedIn is following in the footsteps of Facebook (three years later!) with the rollout of new reactions that give users more ways to express themselves when responding to posts in their feed.
Social Media

Twitter’s experimental Twttr app is even more popular than the real thing

Twttr, the new app that lets regular Twitter users test new features, is proving more popular than the main app, according to the company. The revelation suggests some of the innovations may land for all Twitter users soon.
Social Media

Messenger and Facebook, together again? Facebook tests integrating chats

Longing for the old days where Facebook and Messenger were one app? Facebook is testing an integrated chat option. While Messenger remains more feature-rich, the test brings some chat functionality back into the Facebook app.
Social Media

How to download Instagram Stories on iOS, Android, and desktop

Curious about how to save someone's Instagram Story to your phone? Lucky for you, it can be done -- but it does take a few extra steps. Here's what you need to know to save Instagram Stories on both iOS and Android.
Social Media

Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp went down worldwide for 2 hours this morning

Chaos erupted on the internet this morning, as Facebook, Instagram, and Whatsapp all went down from 6:30 a.m. to approximately 9 a.m. Thousands of users were unable to access the sites or send or receive Whatsapp messages.
Mobile

Skype screen sharing for mobile will let you share your swipes on dating apps

Skype is prepping the launch of screen sharing for mobile so you can share your swipes on dating apps, shop with buddies, or, perhaps, show a PowerPoint presentation to coworkers. It's in beta just now, but anyone can try it.
Social Media

Facebook toys with mixing Stories and News Feed into one swipeable carousel

Facebook's News Feed could look a lot like Stories if a prototype the social media giant is working on rolls out to users. The design change mixes Stories and News Feed posts into a full-screen slideshow that users swipe left to navigate.
Social Media

No more moon showers as Facebook Messenger’s dark mode gets official rollout

Facebook Messenger launched a dark mode last month, but to activate it you had to message the crescent moon to someone. Now it's been rolled out officially, and it can be accessed in a far more sensible way — via settings.
News

Twitter has revealed a launch date for its handy hide replies features

Twitter has revealed a launch date for a feature that lets users hide replies to their tweets. The hope is that it will help the original poster filter out offensive or irrelevant content from conversation threads.