Facebook is a ‘monster’ that obstructs terror investigations, says Israel’s Interior Minister

facebook trending fake news blunders mobile
Facebook’s approach to extremist content is once again in the spotlight following a damning interview by Israel’s Public Minister for Security Gilad Erdan.

Speaking on his country’s domestic TV station Channel 2, Erdan claimed that the social network was “sabotaging” the work of the Israeli police force. He also accused Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg of not doing enough to prevent incitement against Israel on his platform, reports Reuters.

“Facebook today, which brought an amazing, positive revolution to the world, sadly, we see this since the rise of ISIS and the wave of terror, it has simply become a monster,” said Erdan.

“Facebook today sabotages, it should be known, sabotages the work of the Israeli police, because when the Israeli police approach them, and it is regarding a resident of Judea and Samaria, Facebook does not cooperate,” he added. “It also sets a very high bar for removing inciteful content and posts.”

Erdan also urged viewers to lobby Facebook (and Zuckerberg) for change, calling on “the citizens of Israel to flood him in every possible place with the demand to monitor the platform he established and from which he earns billions.”

Israel has issued similar statements in the past, targeting not only Facebook, but also YouTube and Twitter as outlets used to encourage attacks on its citizens.

Following a spate of fatal street attacks on Israelis by perpetrators identified as Palestinians, who are often teenagers, the country has stepped up its scrutiny of social media. Israel claims it is drafting legislation that will permit it to issue takedown notices to social media platforms regarding content deemed as inciting hate or terrorism.

A total of 34 Israelis and two visiting U.S. citizens have been killed since October. Israeli forces have shot dead 201 Palestinians, 137 of whom were believed to be assailants. Palestinian officials claim the killings were the result of a growing desperation among its youth over the collapse of peace talks in 2014, and Israeli settlement expansion into occupied territory, which many countries view as illegal.

Facebook has indirectly denied Erdan’s allegations by declaring that it works closely with Israel, and other countries, to remove content that incites terrorism from its platform.

“We work regularly with safety organizations and policymakers around the world, including Israel, to ensure that people know how to make safe use of Facebook. There is no room for content that promotes violence, direct threats, [or] terrorist or hate speeches on our platform,” the statement said.

“We have a set of community standards designed to help people understand what’s allowed on Facebook, and we call on people to use our report if they find content they believe violates these rules, so that we can examine each case and take quick action.”

It was recently revealed that Facebook, and Google, are moving away from their current content monitoring systems — which rely on users to report policy violations in order for action to be taken — toward an automated takedown process.

Computing

Latest Facebook bug exposed up to 6.8 million users’ private photos

An API bug recently left an impact on Facebook users. Though the issue has since been fixed, some of the apps on the platform had a wrongful access to consumers photos for 12 days between September 13 and September 25. 
Gaming

Hey, Sony! If you make a PS2 Classic, it needs these games

158 million PS2 consoles were sold worldwide during its lifecycle, making it the most successful video game console of all time. It was hard, but we narrowed down the PS2's vast library of games. Here are the best PS2 games of all time.
Business

Chinese court upholds Qualcomm's complaint that Apple infringed on two patents

Apple is following the FTC's lead and has sued Qualcomm for a massive $1 billion in the U.S., $145 million in China, and also in the U.K., claiming the company charged onerous royalties for its patented tech.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

There's more to Amazon Prime than free two-day shipping, including access to a number of phenomenal shows at no extra cost. To make the sifting easier, here are our favorite shows currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Social Media

This event topped Facebook’s biggest moments of the year — again

As the year comes to a close, Facebook is looking back on what users discussed most over the last year. For two years in a row, International Women's Day topped the list. So what else is on the list?
Social Media

This band owns Twitter, according to list of top accounts and tweets for 2018

What was the biggest buzz on Twitter in 2018? Twitter's 2018 Year in Review highlights the biggest tweets, accounts, and hashtags. The most-tweeted celebrities, movies, TV shows, athletes, politicians and more in Twitter's 2018 trends.
Social Media

What do yodeling and Kylie Jenner have in common? YouTube’s top 2018 videos

In a true nod to the variety found on YouTube, the platform's top 10 list of videos from 2018 range from celebrities to sports, from perfectly tossing a picture frame on the wall to a kid yodeling in aisle 12 at Walmart.
Home Theater

It took Tom Cruise to raise awareness of this troublesome TV setting

Tom Cruise, in an unexpected PSA tweet, asks you to turn off motion interpolation on your TV, but stops short of how to do it. Here's more on the topic, along with links to a guide on how to rid your TV of the dreaded "soap opera effect."
Computing

Make a GIF of your favorite YouTube video with these great tools

Making a GIF from a YouTube video is easier today than ever, but choosing the right tool for the job isn't always so simple. In this guide, we'll teach you how to make a GIF from a YouTube video with our two favorite online tools.
Business

Amazon scouted airport locations for its cashier-free Amazon Go stores

Representatives of Amazon Go checkout-free retail stores connected with officials at Los Angeles and San Jose airports in June to discuss the possibility of cashier-free grab-and-go locations in busy terminals.
Social Media

Snapchat facial recognition could soon power a new portrait mode, code suggests

Digging into Snapchat's code suggests a handful of upcoming camera features, including a portrait mode. The feature appears to use facial recognition A.I. to blur the background. The code also suggests an updated camera interface.
Computing

Google+ continues to sink with a second massive data breach. Abandon ship now

Google+ was scheduled to shut its doors in August 2019, but the second security breach in only a few months has caused the company to move its plan forward a few months. It might be a good idea to delete your account sooner than later.
Social Media

Walkie-talkie voice messaging finally comes to Instagram

In its latest grab from messaging apps, Instagram now lets you send walkie-talkie style voice messages. Apps such as Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Snapchat, and iMessage have offered the feature for some time.
Social Media

‘YouTube Rewind 2018’ is about to become its most disliked video ever

YouTube is about to achieve a record it really doesn't want — that of "most-disliked video." Yes, its annual recap of featuring popular YouTubers has gone down really badly this year.