#MasculinitySoFragile is bringing angry men to the forefront

#masculinitysofragile
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It hasn’t even been a century in the United States since the federal government implemented women’s suffrage, and in our 239 year history, there has yet to be a female president. The glass ceiling, while cracked, remains largely intact across a number of industries and professions, and by and large, to say that gender equality has been achieved in this country (or the world in general) would be a stretch of the imagination. After all, we still live in a society where “feminist” is a bad word. And perhaps some of that stigma arises from the fear that the status quo is slowly but surely beginning to change.

This morning on Twitter, the hashtag #MasculinitySoFragile is trending, a jab at the idea that somehow, the rise of women should be equated with the trampling downfall of men. And ironically enough, some of the male responses to the hashtag are driving home the point best of all.

Much of the discussion, which began as a sarcastic slight, has devolved into literal interpretations of “fragility.”

Let's do this, Twitterers! RT if you want to see me fight @MechofJusticeWZ per his request #MasculinitySoFragile pic.twitter.com/uBihFlcA3P

— Pia Glenn (@PiaGlenn) September 23, 2015

Operating that masculinity is inherently tied to physical strength, a number of users have pointed out that masculinity, or proving oneself to be “manly,” often manifests itself in violence toward women or displays of physical strength.

#MasculinitySoFragile because sensitive men feel the need to threaten women with violence as their first response to criticism

— Austin (@kvxll) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile that a woman rejecting your catcall incites you to be violent towards her.

— Foxy HoodratFeminist (@FoxyJazzabelle) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile 10 lb dumbbells might dislocate your shoulder. pic.twitter.com/JNEndHgdi1

— Daniel Snyder (@danmsnyder) September 23, 2015

It's hilarious seeing dudebros getting pissed about & wanting to fight over #MasculinitySoFragile. Y'all are only proving how fragile u are.

— TayGo (@taygogo) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile 
"So if you want equal rights then I get to hit women" 
Like chill out jfc

— Zoë Rain (@zoe_rainfrancis) September 23, 2015

Others have noted the overuse of phrases like “no homo,” “whipped,” or the avoidance of activities and objects considered “feminine.”

#MasculinitySoFragile Guys have to say "no homo" when showing affection to another guy, which is like saying "no Oedipus" when u hug ur mom.

— Brandon Evers (@BrandonEvrs) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile when a guy treats his partner with respect he's considered "whipped"

— Jared J. Krein (@J_Whatitdo) September 23, 2015

In a society where we have a BLACK SUNSCREEN BOTTLE FOR MEN, I think it's safe to say #MasculinitySoFragile

— Michael Rizzi (@MikeRizzi) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile that some men feel that to prove themselves as a "real man" they have to be disrespectful to women and demean them

— ˗ˏˋ blige ˎˊ˗ (@THECAROLDANVERS) September 23, 2015

#MasculinitySoFragile Straight guys live in fear of being objectified/harassed by gay guys. Basically being treated the way they treat girls

— Brandon Evers (@BrandonEvrs) September 23, 2015

And of course, there have been attacks on feminism.

Apparently fighting for economic, social, and political equality of the sexes is emasculating. #MasculinitySoFragile https://t.co/bNZdElrUx1

— Michael Rizzi (@MikeRizzi) September 23, 2015

But thankfully, there are those who recognize the importance not only of the conversation incited by the hashtag, but by feminism itself.

I'd just like to say that the feminist movement has done nothing but empower me as a man. Feminism benefits everyone. #MasculinitySoFragile

— Calum McSwiggan (@CalumMcSwiggan) September 23, 2015

So tweet on, Twitterverse. Because this is one hashtag that is as educational as it is entertaining.

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