Web

Observe World Backup Day 2012 with five easy solutions for stashing your files

Backup computer files

It’s the day before April Fools, and there is bound to a friend out there plotting to tamper with your computer in preparation for what they hope to be a prank of epic proportions. Luckily enough, some Reddit users had the foresight to mark March 31 as “World Backup Day.”

If you’ve been putting it off — today might be the day to make it happen. It’s the one thing that we seem neglect to do despite the inevitability of a failed hard drive down the road. Hard drives are fragile technology, and technically not meant to be carried. (Although, if you own a solid state drive you’ll outlast your HDD counterparts.) When a hard drive breaks, your only option is to cry and start over, or hire an expensive forensic recovery service.

If you’d like to observe this day, the lack of options available to back up your computer isn’t an excuse. The following are some basic recommendations:

bits before bombs how stuxnet crippled irans nuclear dreams usb thumb drive 21. Thumb drive – Thumb drives are dirt cheap and found everywhere – even at job fairs. The price does fluctuate depending on the price and demand, but as technology improves so does the capacity. For those of you who are looking to save essential written documents that most often are only kilobytes in size, including Word documents, PowerPoint presentations, spreadsheets, or photographs – you can quickly store the data in a thumb drive and stash it away in your safe for safekeeping.

2. External Hard Drive – There are two options here. Use an existing hard drive and purchase an external enclosure to transform it into an external drive, or you can simply purchase an external hard drive altogether.

3. Cloud service – Today, everything can be uploaded onto the cloud, and the storage services are endless. Dropbox and SugarSync, are some services to name a few. One simple, free option is simply using Google Docs. Just upload all of your important Word documents, presentations, spreadsheets and photographs onto Google’s servers. Apple’s iCloud service makes backing up your data particularly simple.

4. NAS – Think of a network attached storage device — or NAS — as a hard drive you can get to from anywhere. They can be used for storing data or streaming media, locally or even across the world. You can purchase a NAS for several hundred dollars, or you can save the cash and create a NAS box using an old computer and the free softwsare FreeNAS. Lifehacker has outlined the steps in the detailed guide, “Turn an Old Computer into a Networked Backup, Streaming, or Torrenting Machine with FreeNAS,” which will allow you to create your very own NAS.

5. CDs – This is an old-fashioned methodology, but some of you may find it comforting that somewhere resides a CD or DVD discretely nestled in a dictionary with your files. It’s also dirt cheap, and a ton of modern hardware has the ability to burn CDs or DVDs.

6. All of the above – It’s naive assume that technology will last forever. Hard drives break or fail, CDs can be scratched or cracked, companies that offer cloud storage services can go bankrupt or get hacked, and thumb drives can be easily misplaced. Sensibly, the right move would be to use a mixture of the above. We’d suggest backing up your data to a cloud service and an external hard drive, but when using a cloud service, you should ideally use more than one. We’ve seen customers lose data over the shutdown of MegaUpload, and after the outage of Amazon Web Service.

While we’ve suggested some options for your computer, you should remember to back up your smartphone, gaming console and even Web application data. Remember that no one method of backing up data is fail-safe as the infographic below will show you.

Let us know if you have any alternative methods for backing up your data in the comments below!

Source: facebook.com via World on Pinterest

Product Review

The Sony UBP-X700 brings your 4K TV to life, without draining your savings

If you're after the best possible picture for your 4K TV, you're going to need a disc player. With a compact form factor, extremely easy setup, and great picture and sound quality, the Sony UBP-X700 may be just the ticket.
Mobile

MetroPCS is now Metro by T-Mobile and includes Amazon Prime

Looking for a great prepaid phone plan? MetroPCS is now Metro by T-Mobile, and the veteran carrier is promising to provide a variety of prepaid phone plans that offer great value for money, and access to Google One and Amazon Prime.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with 12 of the best PDF editors

There are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, and though the selection is robust, finding a solid solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here, we've rounded up best PDF editors, so you can edit no matter your budget or OS.
Computing

Documentation shows data recovery possible for Macs with T2 coprocessor

New documentation from Apple shows that data recovery is indeed possible for Macs with T2 Coprocessor thanks to internal diagnostics software, giving users of the 2018 MacBook Pro new hope in the event of a system failure.
Gaming

YouTube has a new destination for gamers as it plans to shutter gaming app

YouTube is shuttering its gaming app early next year and turning its attention to developing a brand-new gaming destination on its main site. The app launched in 2015 as part of efforts to take on video-gaming platform Twitch.
Smart Home

Is Amazon tweaking its search algorithms with a new A.I.-driven shopping site?

Amazon is testing a new shopping site, Amazon Scout, which combines a visual aesthetic with customers' ability to like and dislike products, collecting more data on users' habits and preferences.
Computing

Newegg was cracked, customer data has leaked, and security is clearly scrambled

Online electronics retailer Newegg has found themselves at the heart of an online security breach as the company's payment system was breached, giving hackers of the notorious group, Magecart, potential access to confidential customer data…
Computing

Smart Reply not smart enough? Desktop Gmail users can soon opt out

Google will soon give desktop Gmail users the ability to opt out of Smart Reply. If you'd prefer to compose a short email the old-fashioned way, you can do so without seeing the auto-generated suggestions in the future.
Computing

Ripple cryptocurrency jumps 70 percent in 24 hours after news of bank deal

The Ripple cryptocurrency has seen its value reach the highest point since late 2017 after a tease from a Ripple Labs regulator suggested it could soon be adopted by banks for international money transfers.
Computing

From beautiful to downright weird, check out these great dual monitor wallpapers

Multitasking with two monitors doesn't necessarily mean you need to split your screens with two separate wallpapers. From beautiful to downright weird, here are our top sites for finding the best dual monitor wallpapers for you.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

Amazon Prime brings more perks than just free two-day shipping. Subscribers get access to a huge library of TV shows to stream at no extra cost. Here are our favorite TV shows currently available on Amazon Prime.
Computing

It's not all free money. What to know before you try to mine Bitcoin

Mining Bitcoin today is harder than it used to be, but if you have enough time, money and cheap electricity, you can still turn a profit. Here's how to get started mining Bitcoin at home and in the cloud.
Computing

Bing, Windows search evolve into new, cross-platform Microsoft Search

Microsoft is upgrading its various search tools to provide more contextual help for those seeking it. Bing, Office, and Windows search will all be upgraded over the coming months to provide much more nuanced results.
Computing

U.N. security blunder left secret Trello boards, Google Docs exposed

United Nations documents were left vulnerable to unauthorized users by staffers who left Trello boards and Google Docs unprotected and accessible to anyone who had their unique URLs.