Web

The Washington Post will roll out a paywall this summer

Washington Post

Announced by the paper earlier today, the Washington Post will follow the example set by the New York Times and launch an online paywall for frequent visitors starting during summer 2013. After the paywall is flipped on, readers will be limited to twenty articles or multimedia features for free each month. Once the limit is hit, it’s likely that the Washington Post site will display an overlay requesting that the user sign up for a monthly subscription.

washington post paperAt this time, management at the Washington Post have not decided on the monthly subscription price for digital readers or if there will be tiered prices for readers using mobile devices like smartphones or tablets. According to the Washington Business Journal, the Washington Post has been surveying readers in the Washington D.C. area. Prices within the survey range from unlimited Web access for approximately $8 a month up to unlimited Web access with seven-day print delivery for about $25 a month.

When asked about the launch of the paywall, Washington Post publisher Katharine Weymouth stated “News consumers are savvy; they understand the high cost of a top-quality news gathering operation and the importance of maintaining the kind of in-depth reporting for which The Post is known. Our digital package is a valuable one, and we are going to ask our readers to pay for it and help support our news gathering as they have done for many years with the print edition.”

washington-post-on-ipadWhile a report during December 2012 noted that the Washington Post was looking into different online paywall systems, the newspaper had previously held the position that an online paywall wouldn’t be effective since over ninety percent of online readers were not located within Washington D.C.. Basically, limiting digital access to the site wouldn’t necessarily help increase subscription rates of the print version of the newspaper. 

Much like other paywall structures, subscribers to the print version of the Washington Post will be able to continue accessing the online site without any extra cost. In addition, the paywall will not be active for computers within educational, government or military institutions. For instance, if a teacher needs to access the Washington Post to support a lesson, they will be able to access the site without having to subscribe to the digital version of the newspaper. In regards to sections of the site that will be free to access for all, the home page, section pages and classified advertisements will still be open without a subscription.

While the paywall has the potential to generate more monthly revenue for the newspaper, it could also have an adverse effect on digital advertising. At the moment, digital advertising generates approximately twenty percent of the total advertising revenue for the paper. If people are turned away due to a paywall, pageviews of those display ads could decrease over time and ultimately become less effective for advertisers. 

In order to spur subscriptions to the digital version of the newspaper, developers at the Washington Post plan to launch a new version of the site customized for the iPad. Beyond the Apple tablet, there have been no announcements for a mobile application specifically built for Android tablets. 

Smart Home

Clean up with these Presidents’ Day sales on washers and dryers

Clean up with these Presidents' Day weekend sales on washers and dryers. We picked the top washers and dryers from six major online merchants, but there are many more choices. Altogether the six sites have 920 washers and dryers on sale.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with six of the best PDF editors

Though there are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, finding a solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here are the best PDF editors for your editing needs, no matter your budget or OS.
Gaming

Here’s how to set up a virtual private network (VPN) on your Xbox One

Online privacy is more important now than it's ever been, and gaming is happening online more than ever before. Here's a quick guide on how to set up a VPN for your Xbox One so you game in safe anonymity.
Mobile

Need a date for Valentine's Day? Cozy up with the best dating apps of 2019

Everyone knows online dating can be stressful, time-consuming, and downright awful. Check out our top picks for the best dating apps, so you can streamline the process and find the right date, whatever you're looking for.
Computing

Breaking: Amazon won’t build headquarters in New York in face of opposition

Amazon has canceled plans for a New York City headquarters afer citizens, civic groups, and politicians pushed back on Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's exclamation of economic joy over Amazon's earlier…
Web

Are you one of the billions who have watched these super-popular YouTube videos?

Viral videos can quickly garner millions upon millions of views, but even they fall well behind the view counts on the most watched YouTube videos ever. Those have been watched billions of times.
Business

Marriott asking guests for data to see if they were victims of the Starwood hack

Marriott has created an online form to help you find out if your data was stolen in the massive Starwood hack that came to light toward the end of 2018. But take note, it requires you to submit a bunch of personal details.
Computing

New Chrome feature aimed at preventing websites from blocking Incognito Mode

A new Chrome feature will prevent websites from blocking Chrome users as they browse using Incognito Mode. The feature is supposed to fix a known loophole that allows websites to detect and block those using Incognito Mode.
Computing

Reluctant to give your email address away? Here's how to make a disposable one

Want to sign up for a service without the risk of flooding your inbox with copious amounts of spam and unwanted email? You might want to consider using disposable email addresses via one of these handy services.
Computing

Chrome is a fantastic browser, but is is still the best among new competitors?

Choosing a web browser for surfing the web can be tough with all the great options available. Here we pit the latest versions of Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Edge, and Vivaldi against one another to find the best browsers for most users.
Computing

Microsoft extension adds Google Chrome support for Windows Timeline

The Windows Timeline feature is now much more versatile thanks to the added support for Google's Chrome browser. All you need to do to increase its functionality is to download the official Chrome extension.
Movies & TV

Here’s how to watch the 2019 Oscars livestream online

The 91st Academy Awards will air live on ABC, but there are also a number of ways to watch Hollywood's biggest night online using your mobile device, desktop, or set-top streamer. Here's how to catch the Oscars livestream.
Computing

YouTube changes its strikes system, offers softer first-offense penalty

YouTube announced changes to its strikes system for its content creators. The changes include a softer first-offense penalty for creators who violate YouTube's guidelines and more consistent penalties for further violations.
Computing

An experimental feature could help reduce memory usage in Google Chrome

Google Chrome might be the most popular web browser, but it also is a resource hog. Google is currently working on an experimental feature for Chrome which sets out to reduce its overall memory usage.