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Disney launches a Netflix-like streaming service — but only in the U.K. for now

Being a Disney lover in the U.S. has never been so hard. Today marks the launch of Disney’s new Netflix-like streaming service, DisneyLife, but fans stateside don’t get to be a part of the fun. The service is only available in the U.K.

The subscription service costs £10 per month (about $15, at the time of publishing), which is higher than the cost of either Netflix or Amazon Instant Video’s £6 per month rate in the U.K. However, members get access to a wealth of Disney content; in addition to movies, there are TV shows, novels, picture books, music, and apps, available in up to five languages.

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DisneyLife is billing itself as “the biggest Disney movie collection in one digital membership” and includes everything from animated classics like Fantasia to live-action films like Pirates of the Caribbean, according to DailyMail.com. Disney-Pixar collaborations, such as Toy Story and Up, are available as well. It’s basically the last few generations’ childhoods, in streaming form.

With its extensive library of content, including bloopers, behind-the-scenes videos, and featurettes, DisneyLife definitely has a lot to attract users. Members can even download one app per month from the service’s collection as part of their subscription. These are said to be “interactive adventures” starring Disney characters.

DisneyLife members can create six profiles per subscription and add up to 10 compatible devices. The service is available on iOS and Android, and users can also watch content via Airplay and Chromecast. On top of streaming, subscribers can download content for later consumption.

While there are plans in place for DisneyLife to expand out of the U.K. into other countries next year, Disney CEO Bob Iger has said a stateside launch isn’t currently on the docket. However, he did say that it’s “scalable to the U.S.,” so perhaps all hope isn’t lost.