Have a PC? Play ‘Quake Champions’ during 10-day open tech test

Quake Champions will be opened to all PC gamers from May 12 to 21, Bethesda said on Monday. The company is calling this event its Large Scale Tech Test, and an access code will not be required to play. The game will remain open to play 24/7 during the 10-day event.

Because the Large Scale Tech Test will be open to anyone, players of Quake Champions won’t be bound to a nondisclosure agreement. This will allow all players to stream, capture, and share anything regarding the upcoming shooter. Up until May 12, Bethesda is exclusively providing all information regarding Quake Champions.

In addition to the upcoming open beta, players new and old to Quake Champions will experience a new 4v4 team-based mode called “Sacrifice.” Bethesda doesn’t say much about this new mode other than that players will form teams and choose a Champion “to work together to dominate the Arenas.” It will join the current Deathmatch and Team Deathmatch modes.

Throughout the closed beta process that began on April 6, Bethesda sent out additional access codes to hopeful PC gamers each week. The Large Scale Tech Test will be the first time Bethesda throws open the Quake Champions doors to any willing PC gamer, so expect some initial delays.

Content-wise, there doesn’t appear to be anything new in regard to maps and Champions heading into the Large Scale Tech Test. The map list still consists of Blood Covenant, Ruins of Sarnath, and Burial Chamber.  The Champions roster includes Ranger, Galena, Scalebearer, Slash, Nyx, Clutch, and Anarki.

Bethesda’s Quake Champions is a multiplayer-only game for the PC that carries the torch passed on by Quake III Arena/Quake Live. It incorporates the multiplayer characters from Quake, Quake II, and Quake III Arena while introducing new “Champions” to the Quake mythos. The three maps introduced so far indicate that id Software will be heavy-handed in the Cthulhu-inspired gothic environmental design.

The first Quake hit the PC gaming scene in June 1996,and was one of the first titles to rely on polygons instead of traditional, flat sprites. Players take on the role of Ranger in “Operation Counterstrike” to take down an alien code-named Quake (aka, Shub-Niggurath). Its invasion is the result of humans tampering with teleportation technology.

Quake’s didn’t find huge success in the single-player campaign, but in its multiplayer capability. While players could battle each other in both multiplayer and campaign maps on a network, they could also play strangers online. Of course, the technology was in its infancy at the time partially due to the dependence on quirky dial-up modems, but Quake’s huge multiplayer success opened the doors to other games following down the online path, including Quake II and Quake III Arena.

Quake Champions is slated to arrive in 2017, and with the Large Scale Tech Test starting May 12, the game appears close to hitting retail. It will follow Quake 4, released in 2005, which was handled by Heretic/Hexen developer Raven Software.