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Nintendo Switch dock can scratch console’s screen, and gamers are finding creative ways to stop it

Why it matters to you

Seeing a scratch on a brand new gadget hurts. Here's how to prevent it.

If you own a Nintendo Switch, you may want to take some precautions: Users are reporting that the dock can leave the sides of the screen scuffed up with hairline scratches.

Gaming website Glixel — a new project from the folks behind Rolling Stone — posted photos two days ago showing the sides of its Nintendo Switch marked up with scratches. It seems that the dock only scratches the bezel, and not the portion of the screen where the LCD lies.

More: Nintendo’s Switch is the one console you can take everywhere — here’s what you need to know

The scratching could be a due to Nintendo opting to use plastic to cover the screen rather than a scratch-proof glass, such as Gorilla Glass, which is used for most smartphones to prevent wear and tear. Plastic is a softer material and more malleable, making it prone to scratches.

Fans on the Nintendo Switch subreddit are already coming up with creative solutions to protect their Switches from the dock. User Senkettsu added adhesive foam padding to the rail area where the Switch aligns to slide into the dock. Senkettsu said the foam causes the Switch to fit more snugly, and requires more force to put in and pull out. Others suggest putting microfiber cloth along the rails with double-sided tape. Because the cloth is much thinner than a foam adhesive pad, it should slide in and out more easily. Many users have simply suggested that purchasing a screen protector has become a necessity to minimize the damage.

Nintendo isn’t the first company to catch the ire of its fanbase for releasing a product prone to scratches. When Sony released the PS Vita handheld, it too had a plastic face. And surprise! Many criticized Sony for not opting to use a more durable material, forcing consumers to buy some sort of screen film. Caveat emptor — in this case, let the gamer beware.