BenQ America’s 27-inch desktop monitor is built for video post-production work

benq desktop monitor pv270 technicolor
On Tuesday, BenQ America released a new 27-inch display targeting photographers and video editors. Dubbed the BenQ PV270, this new panel comes with a hood and a native resolution of 2,560 x 1,440 for a reliable editing experience. It’s also Technicolor Color Certified, meaning the desktop monitor meets the strict standards imposed on Hollywood for consistent, accurate colors.

Here are the hardware specs of BenQ’s new display:

Size: 27 inches
Panel type: IPS
Max resolution: 2,560 x 1,440
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Pixel pitch: 0.233mm
Brightness: 250 nits
Native contrast ratio: 1,000:1
Viewing angles: 178 degrees (H) / 178 degrees (V)
Response time: 5ms gray to gray
Color amount: 1.07 billion
Supported color spaces: 100 percent Rec. 709/sRGB
99 percent AdobeRGB
96 percent DCI-P3
Color bit: 10 bits
Ports: 1x SD card reader
1x DVI
3x USB 3.0 (2x down, 1x up)
1x HDMI 1.4
1x DisplayPort 1.2
1x Ethernet

Ideal for video post-production, BenQ’s new panel includes a “brightness uniformity” feature that relies on what the company labels as a “high-precision apparatus” that fine-tunes hundreds of sub-sections embedded in the screen. It also includes a backlight sensor that adjusts the brightness level according to the environment, and hardware-based color calibration so users can change the built-in image processing chip’s settings without having to swap out graphics cards in the PC.

“With the 14-bit 3D Look Up Table (LUT), monitors can display the most accurate color mixture,” the product page states. “14-bit 3D LUT improves RGB color blending accuracy, resulting in impeccable color and gray tone reproduction.”

Other features crammed into the PV270 consist of GamutDuo for viewing multiple videos side-by-side simultaneously that use different color spaces, and a built-in color sensor that automatically adjusts the colors to match the current ambient lighting, complementing the automatic brightness feature. The panel is even capable of 24p video content playback at 72Hz, which is a video format with progressive scanning operating at 24 frames per second.

As for the panel type listed in the specs, IPS is short for In-Plane Switching. It’s newer technology than the previous highly used Twisted Nematic (TN) tech, offering richer colors and wide viewing angles than the older panel tech. TN-based displays are ideal for gamers because of their high brightness and fast response times. Thus, because BenQ is targeting photographers and video content with the PV270 display, naturally the company chose the color-rich tech while throwing in a cover to block out the surrounding ambient light in the process.

Here are several other features packed into the new display:

  • Touch Control Key
  • Eye Protect Sensor
  • Eco Sensor
  • Black Level Adjustment
  • ZeroFlicker Technology
  • HDCP 1.4 support
  • Picture in Picture support
  • Nine Preset Modes

BenQ’s PV270 desktop monitor for Windows and MacOS PCs can be purchased for $900 through BenQ and participating retailers and distributors.

Amazon BenQ

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