Chrome 70 could break thousands of websites, but that’s their own fault

chrome 69 user issues google update

As a result of using old security certificates, thousands of sites on the internet may stop working as soon as October 16. When Google begins rolling out its next version of the Chrome browser  — called Chrome 70 — users navigating to these sites will be greeted with a security warning once Google drops trust for HTTPS security certificates issued by Symantec prior to June 2016.

When Google discovered more than a year ago that Symantec had improperly issued security certificates, it warned that it will drop support for the affected batches of certificates from the security firm. In essence, security certificates issued by Symantec prior to June 2016 won’t be trusted by Chrome 70, and web developers had more than a year to prepare for the change. Security researcher Scott Helme found more than 1,000 sites in the top million websites ranked by Alexa that may be affected by the change once Google rolls out Chrome 70, including a few notable government sites from India and Tel Aviv. A few of the sites on Helme’s list recently changed to new certificates, so they won’t be affected.

In addition to Symantec certificates, users visiting websites using certificates issued by Thawte, VeriSign, Equifax, GeoTrust, and RapidSSL prior to June 2016 will also be greeted with a security warning on Chrome 70, TechCrunch reported.

Google also made recent headlines for some of its efforts in building trust on the internet. The company came under fire with the release of Chrome 69 for trying to hide the “www” portion of a web address in the Chrome omnibox. After users protested, Google reversed course, but it said that the change is still incoming once Chrome 70 launches. An even more radical change that Google is exploring includes killing web addresses altogether. Google hasn’t revealed what the alternative to URLs would be, but the company stated that this is an idea that it is still working on as part of its effort to help build a safer web experience.

Chrome 70 follows on the heels of Chrome’s major redesign with the launch of Chrome 69. The next version of Google’s web browser will introduce new features, such as shape detection and barcode scanning, Web Authentication support with biometric scanners on MacOS and Android where available, and Web Bluetooth support on Windows 10, Google announced. With Chrome 70, Google will also reverse its recent controversial decision to forcibly sign users into the browser once they log into a Google account on the web.

Social Media

Your Google+ public content will remain viewable on the web, if you want it to

Google's failed social network — Google+ — will soon be wiped from the internet, but there's a team of volunteers working right now to save its public content for the Internet Archive.
Computing

Delete tracking cookies from your system by following these quick steps

Cookies are useful when it comes to saving your login credentials and other data, but they can also be used by advertisers to track your browsing habits across multiple sites. Here's how to clear cookies in the major browsers.
Computing

Reluctant to give your email address away? Here's how to make a disposable one

Want to sign up for a service without the risk of flooding your inbox with copious amounts of spam and unwanted email? You might want to consider using disposable email addresses via one of these handy services.
Gaming

Nintendo Switch controllers will soon be compatible with Google Chrome

Nintendo Switch controllers will soon be supported by Google Chrome, according to a new commit spotted by 9to5Google. The code is likely related to Google's Project Stream game streaming service.
Computing

Get the most out of your high-resolution display by tweaking its DPI scaling

Windows 10 has gotten much better than earlier versions at supporting today's high-resolution displays. If you want to get the best out of your monitor, then check out our guide on how to adjust high-DPI scaling in Windows 10.
Mobile

Got gadgets galore? Keep them charged up with the 10 best USB-C cables

We're glad to see that USB-C is quickly becoming the norm. That's why we've rounded up some of the better USB-C cables on the market, whether you're looking to charge or sync your smartphone. We've got USB-C to USB-C and USB-C to USB-A.
Deals

Looking for a Chromebook? The Google PixelBook just got a $200 price cut

Once relatively obscure, Chromebooks have come into their own in a big way in recent years. One of our favorites is the super-sleek Google Pixelbook, and it's on sale right now from Amazon for $200 off, letting you score this premium laptop…
Computing

Nvidia’s GTX 1650 graphics card could be just a slight upgrade over the 1050 Ti

Rumors suggest Nvidia might soon launch the GTX 1650, and a leaked benchmark listing from Final Fantasy XV suggests that the new graphics card could be just a slight upgrade over last generation's GTX 1050 Ti. 
Computing

Get ready to say goodbye to some IFTTT support in Gmail by March 31

If This Then That, the popular automation service, will drop some of its support for Gmail by March 31. The decision comes as a response to security concerns and is aimed to protect user data.
Computing

Get the new Dell XPS 13 for $750 with this limited-time deal

Dell is currently running a limited time deal lasting through Thursday, March 28, where you can bring home a version of this year's new XPS 13 for around $750 with the use of a special coupon code. 
Mobile

This is the easiest way to save your iPhone data to your computer

Living in fear of losing your contacts, photos, messages, and notes on your iPhone? Fear no more -- in this guide, we'll break down exactly how to back up your iPhone to your computer using Apple's iTunes or to the cloud with iCloud.
Mobile

Here are the best iPad Pro keyboard cases to pick up with your new tablet

The iPad Pro range can double as laptops, but they do need proper keyboards to fill in effectively. Thankfully, there are loads to choose from and we rounded up the best iPad Pro keyboard cases right here.
Computing

Microsoft’s Clippy came back from the dead, but didn’t last very long

Before Cortana, Alexa, and Siri even existed, Microsoft Clippy dominated the screens of computers in the 1990s to help assist Microsoft Office users when writing letters. He recently made a bit of a comeback only to die off again.
Computing

Nvidia faces attacks from AMD, Intel, and even Google. Should it be worried?

Nvidia announced an expanded array of RTX server solutions designed to leverage the power of ray-tracing at GTC 2019. The effort will help Nvidia take on Google's Stadia in game streaming with GeForce Now, and the company's investments in…