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How to watch Intel’s Fall desktop event live from NYC

Intel is preparing a press event for today, October 8, in New York City, where we’ll learn more about what the company has in store.

The chip giant hasn’t indicated exactly what the event will cover, but we’re hoping to see the unveiling of some new ninth-generation processors aimed at gamers. Who knows? Maybe we’ll get a hint at what the company is up to in graphics cards too. We can hope, right?

When and how to watch

The event is scheduled for Monday, October 8, at 10 a.m. ET (7 a.m. on the West Coast).

Fortunately, Intel will be live streaming the entire event. You can have a look below.

We’ll be attending the event live in NYC and reporting with news, hands-on demos, and more coverage on what Intel shows off.

What to expect

Intel’s Core i9-9900K Image used with permission by copyright holder

While Intel has been quiet on what we’ll see, we’re all hoping to see some new processors. Rumors surrounding the launch of the Core i9-9900k chip have been intensifying as of late, with a recent leak showing off some stylish packaging and a hefty $580 price tag. The leak (pictured above) also mentioned speeds of up to 5.0 GHz, overclocking capabilities, and hyper-threading technology for “16-way multitasking.” This would be Intel’s first eight-core, 16-thread processor — and according to some leaked benchmarks — could have some pretty impressive results. These new processors are in direct competition with AMD’s new eight-core Threadripper chips.

Finally, we’re also highly anticipating the launch of some new graphics cards from Intel, although those probably won’t be launched until 2020. Even so, we’d be delighted for some hints or teases at what those cards will be like though considering Intel’s recent hires. If it does, it’ll prove to be an important moment for the company and for GPU buyers as a whole.

In addition to the processors themselves, we hope to see the Fall lineup of the latest and greatest machines from the top desktop manufacturers. These big manufacturers often time updates with the next generations of Intel processors, which means more goodies for us. We’re hoping to see some demos and get some hands-on time with these new machines as well.

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Luke Larsen
Luke Larsen is the Senior editor of computing, managing all content covering laptops, monitors, PC hardware, Macs, and more.
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