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Introducing Vid.ly, the first universal video URL service

Users only need to publish a short URL provided by Vid.ly for each source video and the service will deliver the optimized video.  The free Vid.ly beta program, which includes encoding, storage, and delivery, begins today and is available to the first 1,000 qualified users.

For content publishers, there is chaos in the video ecosystem with the growing number of devices and lack of standardization across platforms.  Vid.ly answers the request, “Can you just take my video and make it work for all phones and browsers?”   With Vid.ly, all videos are pre-transcoded to all popular web and mobile formats so that when an end user requests a video, Vid.ly detects his device and serves the correct and optimized video.

Publishers can embed the HTML5 code provided by Vid.ly directly into their web pages or Flash players, or can share the provided short URL via SMS, Facebook, Twitter, or other social media outlets.

“Already serving over a thousand business customers across many industry verticals, Encoding.com is uniquely positioned to understand the needs and priorities for those publishing video to web and mobile devices,” said Jeff Malkin, president of Encoding.com.  “Vid.ly ensures that online video can be experienced on ALL devices and browsers, and has solved this complicated issue in a unique and super-simple way for content producers.”

Encoding.com is the world’s largest video encoding service. Encoding.com eliminates the need for its customers and partners to make heavy investments in expensive hardware/software solutions and overhead required to manage high-volume video transcoding needs, and backs it with a wait-time service level guarantee.  Encoding.com was selected as an Editors’ Pick for 2010 by StreamingMedia.

Laura Khalil
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Laura is a tech reporter for Digital Trends, the editor of Dorkbyte and a science blogger for PBS. She's been named one of…
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